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Greg Veis, YouTube Hunter: Coulter Clash

Every six months or so, reliable as clockwork, we're treated to some grotesquely bilious new statement from Ann Coulter. Lefties roar. Some righties run for cover. Others look the other way or bow their heads in half-apology. Cable news stations dive headlong into another easy-to-moralize-on filler topic perfectly suited for the 24 hour news cycle. And round and round we go.

This weekend, as you must've seen, and if you haven't click here, Coulter shocked no one with her latest foray into clownery, effectively calling John Edwards a "faggot." It was by no means the first time she'd suggested that a major Democratic figure was gay. She saddled Bill Clinton with that one last year, which led to this excellent Letterman bit:

(She also called Al Gore gay. But all in good fun!)

What's curious to me about the woman Andrew Sullivan once nailed as a "drag queen fascist impersonator" isn't that she keeps saying these things--nobody with functioning gray matter should be surprised at this point--it's that she's still allowed to be a part of the national discussion. Tim Hardaway, for one, went off on a nasty anti-gay tirade last week, and the NBA has since taken pains to ensure that he'll never go anywhere near a microphone again. Jimmy the Greek faded away after his racist comments. Al Campanis, too. But why is it that Coulter can defame whomever she damn well pleases in the most audacious manner possible and still be given a seat at the table? I'm not being rhetorical here. Why? Drop your opinions in the comments section. My guesses include: 1) she's too profitable a member of the publishing community; 2) political pundits essentially have tenure, making them impossible to dispose of (how else to explain David Brooks?); 3) there's a serious attraction/repulsion thing going on in watching a tall, blond, and skinny woman rowdily spew hate speech.

Anyway--and I can't believe I'm saying this--but we could all learn something from Adam Carolla:

Or from these two television reporters, who didn't bow, Alan Colmes-style, to her harpiness:

And here is a pie in the face:

I understand there are more pressing and ethically muddied issues to take on, but when are we gonna pull the plug on this lady? I'll admit, in the Clinton and early W. days, I respected her marketing savvy and used to think she was passably good entertainment--a comical counterpoint to the Franken/Moore left--but we're no longer living in relatively happy-go-lucky boom days. Our world is sordid, scary--and far too serious for a contemptuous clown like Ann to hold sway over public opinion.

[Also, this is the first entry I've posted myself. I owe a huge thanks to Mary and Winslow, whose lives I made miserable once a week for the last eight months.]

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Live Smarter
Stop Your Snoring and Track Your Sleep With a Wi-Fi Smart Pillow
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REM-Fit

Everyone could use a better night's rest. The CDC says that only 66 percent of American adults get as much sleep as they should, so if you're spending plenty of time in bed but mostly tossing and turning (or trying to block out your partner's snores), it may be time to smarten up your sleep accessories. As TechCrunch reports, the ZEEQ Smart Pillow improves your sleeping schedule in a multitude of ways, whether you're looking to quiet your snores or need a soothing lullaby to rock you to sleep.

After a successful Kickstarter in 2016, the product is now on sale and ready to get you snoozing. If you're a snorer, the pillow has a microphone designed to listen to the sound of your snores and softly vibrate so that you shift positions to a quieter pose. Accelerometers in the pillow let the sleep tracker know how much you're moving around at night, allowing it to record your sleep stages. Then, you can hook the pillow up to your Amazon Echo or Google Home so that you can have your favorite smart assistant read out the pillow's analysis of your sleep quality and snoring levels the next morning.

The pillow is also equipped with eight different wireless speakers that turn it into an extra-personal musical experience. You can listen to soothing music while you fall asleep, either connecting the pillow to your Spotify or Apple Music account on your phone via Bluetooth or using the built-in relaxation programs. You can even use it to listen to podcasts without disturbing your partner. You can set a timer to turn the music off after a certain period so you don't wake up in the middle of the night still listening to Serial.

And when it's time to wake up, the pillow will analyze your movements to wake you during your lightest sleep stage, again keeping the noise of an alarm from disturbing your partner.

The downside? Suddenly your pillow is just another device with a battery that needs to charge. And forget about using it in a place without Wi-Fi.

The ZEEQ Smart Pillow currently costs $200.

[h/t TechCrunch]

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