Mental Floss

Spacesuits Go Spandex, Harry Potter Goes Green and Checkers Gets Solved!

Jason Plautz
facebooktwitterreddit

Who'll Stop the Rain?

beijing-2008-logo.gif
beijing-2008-logo.gif /
spacesuit1.jpg
spacesuit1.jpg /

Liquid TV, Why You'll Never Be Able to Beat Your Computer in Checkers (if it's really playing) and Bee Deaths Solved all after the jump!

The Chameleon Liquid
Scientists say a new liquid that changes color with exposure to magnetic fields could do for LCD monitors what ethanol is doing to oil. The liquid, which contains oxide particles covered in plastic, is cheaper and easier to make and control. Besides replacing LCD technology, the liquids could also revolutionize paper; The ability to make the liquid as thin and flexible as necessary means that scientists could use it to make rewritable paper. As far as I'm concerned, if they can make a TV that makes Planet Earth look even better for less money, I'm on board.

No Words, Just Emotions
Chinese researchers have created a video player that doesn't just measure volume or time, but also the emotions of the video. The EmoPlayer will eventually be adapted to use emotion-detecting technology, but for now it just lets users edit the emotional timeline. Experiments show that people found it easier to navigate the videos. It'll probably be a while before the EmoPlayer gets fully integrated onto YouTube, so for now here's a quick tip: kittens, puppies and babies always signal happy.

King me!
If neither player makes a mistake, checkers will always end in a draw. That's the result of a study at University of Alberta, Canada, which used computer simulations and plenty of complex math to "solve" checkers. This shows how a computer was able to defeat checkers champ Marion Tinsley in the 1990's and why you'll never be able to beat your computer at work.

Bee Deaths: Case Closed
Weeks I ago I wrote about a condition that was killing the world's bees. Now a Spanish scientist says an Asian parasite called nosema ceranae is to blame. After studying the deaths for several years and testing various theories, he settled on the parasite as the culprit. Asian bees aren't as susceptible to it, but it kills Western honeybees in a matter of days. Among the other ideas that were tested were drought and some odd theory about the electromagnetic waves from cell phones throwing off bee navigation.

facebooktwitterreddit