Mental Floss

Four Pieces of Land Not Worth Fighting Over (But That Never Stopped Anyone)

Jason Plautz
facebooktwitterreddit

The Falkland Islands

fighting in falkland.jpg
fighting in falkland.jpg /

Hans Island

hans island.jpg
hans island.jpg /

A Strip of Mud in Oxfordshire, England

When Ian Fleming penned the first James Bond novel, he had no idea the very land he sat on would later be the center of one of Britain's most expensive land disputes. He probably just complained about the mud. The whole conflict started decades later, when Victor Bingham, who lived in Kiln Cottage, started chopping down trees on a 5-foot wide strip of land bordering the Fleming family's Nettlebed Estate. The Flemings claimed the trees were on their land and got a court injunction to stop Bingham. But Bingham wasn't just any neighbor- he was a member of the noble Lucan line, famous for the disappearance of Lord Lucan. In his aristocratic pride, he continued chopping down the trees, prompting the Fleming family to bring the issue to court. Finally, in 2005, a judge ruled in favor of the Flemings, ending a case that had legal fees totaling $24 thousand. Bingham vows that he'll continue fighting, though, saying that any profits he makes from selling Kiln Cottage will finance his appeal.

Gran Chaco

200px-GranChacoApproximate.jpg
200px-GranChacoApproximate.jpg /
facebooktwitterreddit