CLOSE

2 Rather Curious Fad Diets

Weight loss is a common topic, as any number of ads, articles, news segments and infomercials are likely to let you know. We are all aware that if we cut our intake and hit the gym, we'll lose some of that excess padding. But what if eating in moderation and regular exercise aren't viable options? There are myriad modern diets that suggest one key food or habit, or extol their own magic pill "“ be it a large dose of caffeine, or a large dose of ephedra, or a mixture of caffeine and ephedra "“ so we must restrict ourselves to a choice few. Or, because I drew this spot on The Countdown, just two.

1. The Tape Worm Diet

tapeworms.jpg

Marketed near the turn of the century, the Tape Worm Diet centered on weight loss capsules whose secret ingredient was tapeworm eggs (I should add the word "purportedly," for truth in advertising was never the strongest suit of such marketers). This diet's efficacy is not often disputed (though an intestinal worm can cause pockets of fluid called ascites to collect in the abdomen, causing distention and ruining the figure). Introducing an intestinal parasite that robs the host of calories and nutrients will cause the host to lose weight. It is also likely to cause, depending on the species of worm, a host of other side effects. In the case of the common beef tapeworm, which is benign relative to some other worms, these side effects may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and intestinal blockage. So, probably not the best idea. However, in the interest of fairness, I should mention that there other opinions. [Image courtesy of the Museum of Quackery.]

2. The Grapefruit Diet

grapefruit.jpg
While dating back to the 1930s, this diet became popular in the 1970s, and is one of the stranger fads that keeps coming back. The basic premise is that grapefruit juice has the ability to lower insulin levels, a hormone that plays an important part in how and when you gain weight.

Here are the rules:
1. You must drink 64oz. of water a day.
2. At any meal you may eat until you are full.
3. You must eat the minimum amount of food listed at each meal.
4. You cannot eliminate anything from the diet. Even the bacon, as it is essential to the whole thing working.
5. Drink or eat exactly the amount of grapefruit.
6. Don't eat between meals.
7. Eat or use as much butter as you like.
8. Do not eat desserts, breads, white vegetables or sweet potatoes.
9. You may double or triple helpings of meat, salad or vegetables.
10. Eat until you are stuffed. The more you eat the more weight you will lose.
11. Stay on the diet 12 days, then stop the diet for 2 days and repeat.

These rules accompany a list of acceptable meals. Commentary would only diminish this diet's beauty.

What peculiar diet fads do you have experience with? Did they work?

Erik Dies is an occasional contributor to mentalfloss.com.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
music
Stradivarius Violins Get Their Distinctive Sound By Mimicking the Human Voice
iStock
iStock

Italian violinist Francesco Geminiani once wrote that a violin's tone should "rival the most perfect human voice." Nearly three centuries later, scientists have confirmed that some of the world's oldest violins do in fact mimic aspects of the human singing voice, a finding which scientists believe proves "the characteristic brilliance of Stradivari violins."

Using speech analysis software, scientists in Taiwan compared the sound produced by 15 antique instruments with recordings of 16 male and female vocalists singing English vowel sounds, The Guardian reports. They discovered that violins made by Andrea Amati and Antonio Stradivari, the pioneers of the instrument, produce similar "formant features" as the singers. The resonance frequencies were similar between Amati violins and bass and baritone singers, while the higher-frequency tones produced by Stradivari instruments were comparable to tenors and contraltos.

Andrea Amati, born in 1505, was the first known violin maker. His design was improved over 100 years later by Antonio Stradivari, whose instruments now sell for several million dollars. "Some Stradivari violins clearly possess female singing qualities, which may contribute to their perceived sweetness and brilliance," Hwan-Ching Tai, an author of the study, told The Guardian.

Their findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. A 2013 study by Dr. Joseph Nagyvary, a professor emeritus at Texas A&M University, also pointed to a link between the sounds produced by 250-year-old violins and those of a female soprano singer.

According to Vox, a blind test revealed that professional violinists couldn't reliably tell the difference between old violins like "Strads" and modern ones, with most even expressing a preference for the newer instruments. However, the value of these antique instruments can be chalked up to their rarity and history, and many violinists still swear by their exceptional quality.

[h/t The Guardian]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
quiz
Orange-Themed Trivia
iStock
iStock

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios