Mental Floss

Results Not Typical: Celebrity Secrets Behind the Advertised Weight Loss

Kara Kovalchik
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The Federal Trade Commission is currently reviewing new guidelines for product endorsements. Their major beef? Advertisements that show "extreme" benefits of a product with a tiny, fine-print disclaimer. The new rules will force advertisers to show the typical or average results consumers can expect after using their product. And many companies are already sweating over the impact this may have on sales. As one rep put it, "Someone who can't fit in an airline seat is not going to pick up the phone for a 10-pound weight change."

Some of the celebrity spokespersons who might find their contracts affected by the new rules include:

Jillian Barberi's "Before" Shots

Nutrisystem spokesmodel Jillian Barberi boasts of losing 41 lbs. on the plan. What the fine print fails to mention is that in her "before" photos, Jillian is pregnant. Alert viewers in the Los Angeles area spotted her wearing the same dress (in the same physical shape) on a local morning TV show while gushing about her expected baby. Once baby Ruby was born, Barberi not only went on the Nutrisystem plan, she also hired a personal trainer (according to an interview in People) to get herself back in shape.

The Osmond Way

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Jared's Subway Secret

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No Ordinary Quacks

The new regulations will also require medical professionals who endorse products (often just referred to onscreen as "Dr.  ----", with no specialty or credentials listed) to be a specialist in said field; that is, an ophthalmologist could not legally give expert advice regarding a colon cleansing product. It will also be required that celebrities who endorse a product must reveal whether or not they are getting paid for the promotion and if they have an ownership interest in said product.

Which ads will you be glad to see struck down by the new rules? Those "work at home" schemes which prey on the elderly and the unemployed? Or maybe the myriad of skin rejuvenation products that subtly suggest women will certainly be dumped for a younger model if they let their face go to seed? Of course, men are also targets of insecurity, with all those "enhancement" products being pitched"¦.   Don't be shy, voice your outrage!

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