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18 Delightfully Artistic Vintage STD Posters

While sexually transmitted diseases are certainly a serious problem, the taboo topic has led to some amazing Public Safety Announcements, particularly the vintage venereal disease posters. Here are a few classic posters designed to help keep the men and women of America safe.

Post World War I

When the Allies won the war, the U.S. government had one last task for its troops: help fight VD back home. Presumably, the last thing they wanted soldiers to do was to come home and celebrate with a bunch of easy women. Of course, if the number of Depression-Era STD posters printed by the WPA are any indication, the “army’s fight against venereal disease” wasn’t very effective.

By McMennamin

The Great Depression

I’ve talked a bit about the Works Progress Administration’s art projects before, but not all of the artists were hired to help promote travel. Instead, many artists were employed to create PSA-style posters warning about the dangers of venereal disease, encouraging everyone to get tested and for those who have a disease to get treated. For more great WPA VD posters, visit the Library of Congress’ massive photo archives.

By Wheatley

By Richard Halls

World War II

The most famous VD posters come from WWII. The Allies had a hard time keeping young recruits away from women, both away and at home. If you can’t get enough though, take some time to search through the archives of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Artist Unknown

By John Wyeth

Artist Unknown

Artist Unknown

By Bode

By Bode

By Ferree

As I’m sure you know, STDs didn’t just disappear after WWII. In fact, the government is still printing out tons of the posters, as well as paying for television and radio PSAs. That being said, those modern creations just don’t have the same entertainment value as these vintage posters. That’s why I’ll leave you with one post-WWII VD poster, this one from 1952:

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Afternoon Map
8 City Maps Rendered in the Styles of Famous Artists
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iStock

Vincent van Gogh once famously said, "I dream my painting and I paint my dream." If at some point in his career he had dreamed up a map of Amsterdam, where he lived and derived much of his inspiration from, it may have looked something like the one below.

In a blog post from March, Credit Card Compare selected eight cities around the world and illustrated what their maps might look like if they had been created by the famous artists who have roots there.

The Andy Warhol-inspired map of New York City, for instance, is awash with primary colors, and the icons representing notable landmarks are rendered in his famous Pop Art style. Although Warhol grew up in Pittsburgh, he spent much of his career working in the Big Apple at his studio, dubbed "The Factory."

Another iconic and irreverent artist, Banksy, is the inspiration behind London's map. Considering that the public doesn't know Banksy's true identity, he remains something of an enigma. His street art, however, is recognizable around the world and commands exorbitant prices at auction. In an ode to urban art, clouds of spray paint and icons that are a bit rough around the edges adorn this map of England's capital.

For more art-inspired city maps, scroll through the photos below.

[h/t Credit Card Compare]

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Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
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There’s a Ghost Hiding in This Illustration—Can You Find It?
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

A hidden image illustration by Gergely Dudás, a.k.a. Dudolf
Gergely Dudás - Dudolf, Facebook

Gergely Dudás is at it again. The Hungarian illustrator, who is known to his fans as “Dudolf,” has spent the past several years delighting the internet with his hidden image illustrations, going back to the time he hid a single panda bear in a sea of snowmen in 2015. In the years since, he has played optical tricks with a variety of other figures, including sheep and Santa Claus and hearts and snails. For his latest brainteaser, which he posted to both his Facebook page and his blog, Dudolf is asking fans to find a pet ghost named Sheet in a field of white bunny rabbits.

As we’ve learned from his past creations, what makes this hidden image difficult to find is that it looks so similar to the objects surrounding it that our brains just sort of group it in as being “the same.” So you’d better concentrate.

If you’ve scanned the landscape again and again and can’t find Sheet to save your life, go ahead and click here to see where he’s hiding.

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