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Nail Clipping in Space

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YouTube

How do you clip your nails in space? Short answer: very carefully! (Stray bits of material floating around your space vessel can be a problem.) In this video shot on the International Space Station, Commander Chris Hadfield shows us how he solved the problem.

(Bonus space fun: keep an eye on his watch as it floats loose around his wrist.)

Commander Hadfield played a song with Barenaked Ladies live from space after trimming his nails. Not bad, Commander!

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Space
When Will the Next Total Solar Eclipse Travel Across the U.S.?
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iStock

On August 21, people across the continental U.S. got to witness a spectacular total solar eclipse. From Oregon to South Carolina, those in the path of totality saw the world go dark as the Moon completely covered the Sun. Even people hundreds of miles away from the path were able to see a partial eclipse.

The highly anticipated event was rare because of the path it carved across the U.S. Total solar eclipses happen often enough, but 2017 was the first year one has been visible from the contiguous U.S. since 1979.

If you didn’t get to see the full eclipse this year, you’ll get a second chance—as long as you’re willing to wait a few years. The next total eclipse to cross the continental U.S. will occur in 2024, traversing parts of Mexico before heading up through Texas, across the Midwest, and past Buffalo and northwestern New England before crossing the Atlantic Ocean.

Future eclipses
Lucy Quintanilla

On April 8, 2024, cities like Dallas and Killeen, Texas; Hot Springs, Arkansas; Poplar Bluff, Missouri; Bloomington, Indiana; Cleveland, and Buffalo will get to witness the beauty of the solar corona, an event that dedicated eclipse chasers—who travel the world in pursuit of eclipse experiences—alternately describe as terrifying, weird, thrilling, mind-blowing, life-changing, and not entirely different from taking psychedelics.

See if you'll be in the path of totality come 2024 here. If you're going to travel to see it, you’d be smart to book your accommodations well in advance, since lodging in cities in the path of totality can book up years before the event. And this time, don't forget the eclipse glasses.

If you won’t be in the Midwest or New England in 2024, you’ll have another chance at an American eclipse viewing eventually. In August 2045, a total solar eclipse will journey across northern California through the continental U.S. and down to Florida and the Caribbean, passing over major cities from Reno to Miami along the way.

If you don’t want to wait until then, take a look at this infographic to see where across the world you can find an eclipse sooner. But our recommendation? Book yourself a room in Hot Springs for six years from now and prepare to take a rejuvenating soak while you watch.

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Can’t See the Eclipse in Person? Watch NASA’s 360° Live Stream
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Ian Hitchcock/Getty Images

Depending on where you live, the historic eclipse on August 21 might not look all that impressive from your vantage point. You may be far away from the path of totality, or stuck with heartbreakingly cloudy weather. Maybe you forgot to get your eclipse glasses before they sold out, or can't get away from your desk in the middle of the day.

But fear not. NASA has you covered. The space agency is live streaming a spectacular 4K-resolution 360° live video of the celestial phenomenon on Facebook. The livestream started at 12 p.m. Eastern Time and includes commentary from NASA experts based in South Carolina. It will run until about 4:15 ET.

You can watch it below, on NASA's Facebook page, or on the Facebook video app.

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