The Quickest, Cheapest Way to Get to the Airport in 12 Cities

iStock
iStock

Taking a taxi to the airport is always convenient, but it comes at a cost: Sometimes you spend far more money than you’d save in the time you’d otherwise spend on a train or a bus. But that all depends on what airport you’re flying out of.

The travel site lastminute.com analyzed the average time and cost it will run you to get from 12 different city centers to their respective international airports, comparing routes by taxi, Uber, train, and bus. (Note that the cost is in pounds, which is currently worth about $1.30, so the fares are actually a little higher for American travelers.)

At Los Angeles International Airport, there is no train at all that runs straight to the airport, so it’s probably worth your money to spring for a car. But there, Uber is cheaper than a taxi, making it the easiest and most cost-effective option. By contrast, in both London and Rome, the train is both the cheapest and the fastest method to get to the airport.

Compare more travel methods in the infographic:

Thursday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Guitar Kits, Memory-Foam Pillows, and Smartwatches

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 3. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

See What the World’s Reading Habits Look Like in 2020

Christin Hume, Unsplash
Christin Hume, Unsplash

When most of the world went into lockdown at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, many people found themselves with a lot of extra free time. Some people used that time to bake bread, make crafts, or play video games. For the bibliophiles of the world, quarantine was the perfect chance to burn through their pile of books to read. This infographic shows how reading habits changed across the globe in 2020.

The editing and proofreading service Global English Editing gathered these statistics from various sources, including Pew Research and Amazon's bestsellers page. It found 35 percent of web users worldwide reported reading more during the pandemic, and 14 percent said they read significantly more. This trend was most dramatic in China, where 44 percent of respondents said they increased their reading time due to the coronavirus.

This uptick became apparent in March 2020, when many countries implemented coronavirus lockdowns for the first time. There were 1.51 billion visits to book and literature e-commerce sites that month—an 8.5 percent increase from the month before. As for what books people are reading, apocalyptic fiction like Stephen King's The Stand has been popular in the age of COVID-19.

For a full snapshot of the world's reading habits at this point in history, check out the infographic below.