Keisari Brewery Debuts 1000-Pack of Beer at Finnish Supermarkets

Aleksi Grön, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0
Aleksi Grön, Flickr // CC BY-NC 2.0

Finnish brewery Keisari isn’t one to be overshadowed. After rival company Karjala debuted a 100-pack of beer as a reverse April Fools' Day prank, Keisari took it as a challenge and outdid them tenfold. As Grub Street reports, the 1000-pack of beer appeared in grocery stores around Finland during the last weekend of April.

It may look like a Photoshop hoax gone too far, but the package is no joke. The 1000 cans of lager were available in K-supermarkets to whoever was willing to shell out $2343 (more than $2 per beer) to take them home.

After stacking them in 12-by-18-can blocks, each pack actually ended up containing 1080 beers, making the offer even more absurd than advertised. Imbibers looking to replenish their beer cache for the next few years—or throw one legendary party—had until May to buy the drinks in bulk. After that, the stores broke the packs up into smaller portions. The scaled-down packs may not look as impressive, but they should at least be easier to fit inside a shopping cart.

[h/t Grub Street]

Prepared Salads Sold at Target, Walmart, and Aldi Have Been Recalled Over E. Coli Concerns

samael334/iStock via Getty Images
samael334/iStock via Getty Images

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced on Thursday that Missa Bay, LLC is recalling more than 75,000 pounds of pre-packaged salads after one tested positive for E. coli. News Channel 9 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, reports that the products were made between October 14 and October 16, and were sold at Target, Aldi, Walmart, and other stores.

According to the USDA’s statement, the Maryland Department of Health found traces of E. coli O157:H7 on the lettuce in a Ready Pac Bistro Chicken Raised Without Antibiotics Caesar Salad, and all products with lettuce from the same lot are included in the recall. You can see the full list of salads here.

Missa Bay, LLC is based in Swedesboro, New Jersey, and they ship to these states: Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

If you have any salad bowls in your refrigerator at the moment, toss any with the establishment number “EST. 18502B” and “Use by” dates from October 29 through November 1. It’s a good opportunity to sweep the corners of your fridge for any other expired products, so you can make room for next week’s Thanksgiving leftovers.

Wondering how exactly how food contamination is discovered, tested, and dealt with? Find out the anatomy of a food recall here.

[h/t News Channel 9]

Food for Fines: Many Communities Let Residents Pay Parking Tickets With Canned Food Donations

Warren_Price/iStock via Getty Images
Warren_Price/iStock via Getty Images

Depending on where you live, paying off your parking tickets could be a chance to give back to the underserved members of your community this holiday season. Towns, cities, and universities across the country are embracing food for fines programs: initiatives that allow residents to settle their parking debts by donating non-perishable food items.

Accepting canned goods in lieu of cash parking ticket payments isn't a new practice. Lexington, Kentucky has been running holiday food for fines drives since 2013. Even in larger cities, like Las Vegas, such programs have proven successful. Recently in Muncie, Indiana, the local police department used it as an opportunity to collect pet supplies instead of pantry staples.

The model has become more popular in recent years, and this holiday season, it will be easier than ever to find a food for fines program near you. In Bay Village, Ohio, a city located about 15 miles west of Cleveland, officials are looking for non-perishables to provide to the local Bay Food Ministry. Individual items are worth $5 in owed parking fines, with the town waiving up to $25 per person.

Universities are also hopping on board the trend. At the University of Colorado Boulder, students can donate five items to have their parking tickets forgiven. Bloomsburg University in Pennsylvania has already collected more than 100 cans from students through its own food for fines program.

Many of the initiatives will run through this Friday and conclude ahead of Thanksgiving week, so if you have a parking ticket you need to pay off, contact your local parking services office soon to see if it's participating.

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