Czech Architects Covered a Building Facade With Hundreds of Plastic Chairs

iStock
iStock

Seeking to give their shop a low-cost, high-statement makeover, MY DVA Group, a furniture company in the Czech city of Brno, hired local architect firm Chybik + Kristof to make the former car showroom look like a place that sold home furnishings. Their solution, according to Dezeen, was to cover three sides of it in furniture: 900 used black plastic chairs, all of which cost around $3 each.

Each of the individual chairs are attached to a steel structure that covers the building’s original facade. They’re removed once or twice a year, when the building needs cleaning.

The look is sculptural and modern, while also being playful and informative: "We are a young studio and we think all our designs should be a bit funny," Ondrej Chybik, a co-founder of Chybik + Kristof, told Dezeen. "But in a smart way of sharing information about the building's programatic function."

Check out some pictures of MY DVA Group's furniture-covered store below.

[h/t Dezeen]

Wednesday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Computer Monitors, Plant-Based Protein Powder, and Blu-ray Sets

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 2. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

13 Unbelievable Unfinished Projects

The National Monument of Scotland.
The National Monument of Scotland.

Sometimes, your 10-hour movie adaptation of Frank Herbert’s novel Dune—set to star Mick Jagger, Salvador Dalí, and Orson Welles—simply never ends up panning out (looking at you, Alejandro Jodorowsky).

For every building built, painting painted, and film filmed, there are countless others that fall by the wayside for some reason or another. On this episode of The List Show, Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy has scoured the margins of history to tell the most fascinating stories of projects left unfinished. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the Grim Reaper is often to blame; Jane Austen gave up on Sanditon not long before her death, and Franklin D. Roosevelt passed away the same day Elizabeth Shoumatoff was trying to paint his portrait. Other projects proved too expensive to finish—like Cincinnati’s subway system.

So what happens to all the novels with no endings and tunnels with no trains? Press play below to find out, and explore other episodes of The List Show on the Mental Floss YouTube channel.