Photographer Explores the Quirky Scenes From Estate Sales

Norm Diamond, Daylight Books
Norm Diamond, Daylight Books

Estate sales are an interesting slice of American culture. They let you enter a home and leave with anything that's not bolted down—for the right price.

Photographer Norm Diamond is interested in the unusual nature of estate sales and has traveled all over the country visiting them and documenting his journey. His travels have shown him a whole array of knick-knacks and belongings that give some clues about the people who used to own them. The photographs are often humorous or sad, always touching on something very human and intimate.

You can find these photos in Diamond's new book published by Daylight Books, What Is Left Behind: Stories From Estate Sales. The book, which is currently available for pre-order, comes out May 16.

Tape Measure

Empty Frame

Cowboy Songs

Everything Must Go

Everything Must Go

Man of the House

Marilyn Puzzle

Off Limits

Playboy Collection

Sewing Table

Stetsons and Old Spice

Thousands Pay Homage

All images by Norm Diamond, courtesy of Daylight Books.

Thursday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Guitar Kits, Memory-Foam Pillows, and Smartwatches

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 3. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

What Did the Hubble Telescope See on Your Birthday? This NASA Website Will Show You

A 2010 Hubble-captured image of a pillar of gas and dust in a stellar nursery called Carina Nebula.
A 2010 Hubble-captured image of a pillar of gas and dust in a stellar nursery called Carina Nebula.

The Hubble Space Telescope was launched into orbit on April 24, 1990, and it has spent the last three decades enriching our understanding of the cosmos more than we ever could’ve imagined. This year, NASA is celebrating the telescope's 30th birthday with another launch: a website that shows you a photo of what the Hubble saw on your birthday.

Because the telescope is exploring space every hour of every day, the images it has captured over the years are both fascinating and varied. You could see a globular star cluster, a dust storm on Mars, or something else entirely. You only need to enter the date and month of your birthday on the site, so the image you get won’t necessarily be from the year you were born—and, if you were born before 1990, it definitely won’t be—but it’s pretty fun to juxtapose how you were spending that particular birthday with how the Hubble was spending it. While your parents were snapping a shot of you blowing out the candles at your eighth birthday party, for example, the Hubble might’ve been snapping a shot of the beautiful auroras around Jupiter’s north pole.

The telescope was first conceived all the way back in 1946 by Yale University astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer, Jr., who published a paper about the possible advantages of having what he called a “large space telescope” in orbit to help astronomers study the galaxies. The project finally got off the ground in the 1970s, and the telescope was designed so that astronauts could periodically upgrade it while still in orbit. Since it first broke through the atmosphere in 1990, the Hubble—named after astronomer Edwin Hubble, who proved the existence of other galaxies beyond the Milky Way—has taught us that the universe is 14 billion years old, that its expansion is speeding up, and so much more.

Unlock your birthday image on the Hubble website here, and check out more stellar photos taken by the Hubble here.