Stunning Timelapse of Flowers Opening for Spring

Jamie Scott, Vimeo

Jamie Scott, Vimeo

It took three springs for New York-based photographer and visual effects artist Jamie Scott to put together his latest timelapse, a four-minute piece of eye candy that tracks a series of blooming flowers.

He grew the flowers that appear in the film under a grow light in his house, which he also used as the light source for the video. He also managed to film plants blooming in Central Park while making the shots look seamlessly woven together. He could only shoot plants that were in season, so he had a short window of time to figure out how best to capture them. The flowers didn’t always bloom exactly how he expected, which made the process even more time consuming. In the end, he ended up with eight terabytes of footage that eventually became the short film.

For the viewer, it’s totally worth it. After you watch the timelapse below, read the whole account Scott gave to Fstoppers about how he made the video, because the whole process sounds crazy complicated.

Don’t miss out on his last viral timelapse hit, either. It’s called “Fall.”

[h/t Colossal]

Keep Hackers Out Forever With This Top-Rated VPN for Just $39

Poike/iStock via Getty Images Plus
Poike/iStock via Getty Images Plus

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What Did the Hubble Telescope See on Your Birthday? This NASA Website Will Show You

A 2010 Hubble-captured image of a pillar of gas and dust in a stellar nursery called Carina Nebula.
A 2010 Hubble-captured image of a pillar of gas and dust in a stellar nursery called Carina Nebula.

The Hubble Space Telescope was launched into orbit on April 24, 1990, and it has spent the last three decades enriching our understanding of the cosmos more than we ever could’ve imagined. This year, NASA is celebrating the telescope's 30th birthday with another launch: a website that shows you a photo of what the Hubble saw on your birthday.

Because the telescope is exploring space every hour of every day, the images it has captured over the years are both fascinating and varied. You could see a globular star cluster, a dust storm on Mars, or something else entirely. You only need to enter the date and month of your birthday on the site, so the image you get won’t necessarily be from the year you were born—and, if you were born before 1990, it definitely won’t be—but it’s pretty fun to juxtapose how you were spending that particular birthday with how the Hubble was spending it. While your parents were snapping a shot of you blowing out the candles at your eighth birthday party, for example, the Hubble might’ve been snapping a shot of the beautiful auroras around Jupiter’s north pole.

The telescope was first conceived all the way back in 1946 by Yale University astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer, Jr., who published a paper about the possible advantages of having what he called a “large space telescope” in orbit to help astronomers study the galaxies. The project finally got off the ground in the 1970s, and the telescope was designed so that astronauts could periodically upgrade it while still in orbit. Since it first broke through the atmosphere in 1990, the Hubble—named after astronomer Edwin Hubble, who proved the existence of other galaxies beyond the Milky Way—has taught us that the universe is 14 billion years old, that its expansion is speeding up, and so much more.

Unlock your birthday image on the Hubble website here, and check out more stellar photos taken by the Hubble here.