Celebrate the Beauty of Space History With This Poster

Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

Space travel is a beautiful thing to behold. The celestial bodies are stunning, and there's also something to be said about the earthly equipment used to get up there to see them. As we've seen with NASA's graphics standard manual, people love the designs that cover space suits and spacecrafts. Now, Pop Chart Labs celebrates this love with a new poster that visually catalogs the history of space travel through space suits, spacecraft, and more. Next to the various rockets and suits, there are timelines showing over 400 expeditions from 1961 to today.

This isn't the company's first space-themed effort. Previously, we wrote about their poster dedicated to humanity's many space explorations. But why let one space-themed poster have all the fun?

Celebrate the Holidays With the 2020 Harry Potter Funko Pop Advent Calendar

Funko
Funko

Though the main book series and movie franchise are long over, the Wizarding World of Harry Potter remains in the spotlight as one of the most popular properties in pop-culture. The folks at Funko definitely know this, and every year the company releases a new Advent calendar based on the popular series so fans can count down to the holidays with their favorite characters.

SIGN UP TODAY: Get exclusive deals, product news, reviews and more with the Mental Floss Smart Shopping Newsletter!

Right now, you can pre-order the 2020 edition of Funko's popular Harry Potter Advent calendar, and if you do it through Amazon, you'll even get it on sale for 33 percent off, bringing the price down from $60 to just $40.

Funko Pop!/Amazon

Over the course of the holiday season, the Advent calendar allows you to count down the days until Christmas, starting on December 1, by opening one of the tiny, numbered doors on the appropriate day. Each door is filled with a surprise Pocket Pop! figurine—but outside of the trio of Harry, Hermione, and Ron, the company isn't revealing who you'll be getting just yet.

Calendars will start shipping on October 15, but if you want a head start, go to Amazon to pre-order yours at a discount.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Your Tattoos Could Be Messing With Your Sweat Glands

Tattoos might inhibit a person's ability to sweat.
Tattoos might inhibit a person's ability to sweat.
vgajic/iStock via Getty Images

For centuries, tattoos have reflected cultural traditions, personal beliefs, self-expression, and one’s preferred motorcycle club affiliation. But those who have used their bodies as a giant canvas for permanent ink with meaning might have a little trouble cooling off. That’s because tattoos might actually be interfering with sweating, according to a new study.

A paper published in the Journal of Applied Physiology recruited 10 subjects with tattoos and had them wear tube-lined suits containing warm water. When fitted against the skin, the warmth induced sweating. Skin covered by a tattoo produced roughly 15 percent less sweat than unmarked skin in the same subject.

While the sample size was small, the study follows other research into the effects of tattooing on sweat glands. In 2017, Alma College’s Maurie Luetkemeier used an electric current to produce sweat and found inked skin produced 50 percent less sweat, though the method to promote the sweat was considerably different than how the body cools itself naturally. Another study used exercise to observe sweating and found no difference in tattooed and non-tattooed skin.

This latest research seems to indicate that thermal-induced sweating can indeed be interrupted by tattoo ink and that a person’s sweat glands suffer an undetermined amount of damage as a result of being tattooed, which involves a needle being inserted into the skin’s dermal layer. While further research will be needed to make more solid conclusions, it’s something to consider the next time you ponder getting that full-back dragon rendering.

[h/t New Atlas]