LEGO Releases Guggenheim Museum Set to Celebrate Frank Lloyd Wright's 150th Birthday

Not every architecture buff can follow in the footsteps of Frank Lloyd Wright, but thanks to LEGO, they can now build a small-scale replica of one of his most important public works. As Dezeen reports, the toy brand has released a brand-new set of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum to celebrate the architect’s 150th birthday on June 8.

A LEGO set of the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright

The 744-piece collection is part of the company’s LEGO Architecture series, which includes models of famous buildings and landmarks like Buckingham Palace and the Burj Khalifa skyscraper in Dubai.

The set depicts the museum’s dramatically curved façade, along with the 10-story limestone tower that was added to the building in 1992. In front of the museum, mini yellow cabs whiz along a plastic Fifth Avenue.

A LEGO set of the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright

For the uninitiated, the Guggenheim Museum in New York opened to the public in 1959, just six months after Wright’s death at the age of 91. Critics gave it mixed reviews, with one describing it as “the most beautiful building in America,” and another referring to the structure as “less a museum than it is a monument to Frank Lloyd Wright.” Others likened it to an "inverted oatmeal dish," or a "hot cross bun." Today, the Guggenheim is celebrated as the last major work of Wright's career, and as a pioneering work of modernist architecture.

A LEGO set of the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright

Technically, this isn’t LEGO’s first Guggenheim set: They released a smaller model of the museum in 2009, but the new one is reportedly more precise. It’s currently available for purchase on LEGO’s website, or from Target. And if you want to celebrate Wright’s legacy in person in New York City, the Guggenheim is hosting a day-long celebration on June 8, complete with a special reduced admission fee of $1.50.

[h/t Dezeen]

These Rugged Steel-Toe Boots Look and Feel Like Summer Sneakers

Indestructible Shoes
Indestructible Shoes

Thanks to new, high-tech materials, our favorite shoes are lighter and more comfortable than ever. Unfortunately, one thing most sneakers are not is durable. They can’t protect your feet from the rain, let alone heavy objects. Luckily, as their name implies, Indestructible Shoes has come up with a line of steel-toe boots that look and feel like regular sneakers.

Made to be incredibly strong but still lightweight, every pair of Indestructible Shoes has steel toes, skid-proof grips, and shock-absorption technology. But they don't look clunky or bulky, which makes them suitable whether you're going to work, the gym, or a family gathering.

The Hummer is Indestructible Shoes’s most well-rounded model. It features European steel toes to protect your feet, while the durable "flymesh" material wicks moisture to keep your feet feeling fresh. The insole features 3D arch support and extra padding in the heel cup. And the outsole features additional padding that distributes weight and helps your body withstand strain.

Indestructible Shoes Hummer.
The Hummer from Indestructible Shoes.
Indestructible Shoes

There’s also the Xciter, Indestructible Shoes’s latest design. The company prioritized comfort for this model, with the same steel toes as the Hummer, but with additional extra-large, no-slip outsoles capable of gripping even smooth, slippery surfaces—like, say, a boat deck. The upper is made of breathable moisture-wicking flymesh to help keep your feet dry in the rain or if you're wearing them on the water.

If you want a more breathable shoe for the peak summer months, there's the Ryder. This shoe is designed to be a stylish solution to the problem of sweaty feet, thanks to a breathable mesh that maximizes airflow and minimizes sweat and odor. Meanwhile, extra padding in the midsole will keep your feet protected.

You can get 44 percent off all styles if you order today.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

The Tallest Cemetery Monument in New Orleans Was Built Out of Spite

baldeaglebluff, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0
baldeaglebluff, Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Spite has motivated many construction projects, from a 40-foot-tall fence in California to an 8-foot-wide home in Massachusetts. But when it comes to pettiness, few structures can beat Moriarty Monument in New Orleans's Metairie Cemetery. Reaching 80 feet high, the memorial to Mary Moriarty was an excuse for her widower to show off his wealth to everyone who rejected him.

New Orleans is famous for its cemeteries, which feature above-ground mausoleums. The soil in the region is too wet and swampy to dig traditional 6-foot graves, so instead, bodies are interred at the same level as the living. The most impressive of these graveyards may be Metairie Cemetery on Metairie Road and Pontchartrain Boulevard. Built in 1872, it lays claim to the most above-ground monuments and mausoleums in the city, the tallest of which is the Moriarty Monument.

The granite tomb was commissioned by Daniel A. Moriarty, an Irish immigrant who moved to New Orleans with little money in the mid-1800s. It was there he met his wife, Mary Farrell, and together they started a successful business and invested their new income into real estate. The couple was able to build a significant fortune this way, but Moriarty struggled to shake off his reputation as a poor foreigner. The city's upper class refused to accept him into their ranks—something Moriarty never got over. After his wife died in 1887, he came up with an idea that would honor her memory and hopefully tick off the pretentious aristocrats at the same time.

By 1905, he had constructed her the grandest memorial he could afford. In addition to the towering steeple, which is a topped with a cross, the site is adorned with four statues at the base. These figures represent faith, hope, charity, and memory, while the monument itself is meant to be a not-so-virtuous middle finger to all those who insulted its builder.

Gerard Schoen, community outreach director for Metairie Cemetery, told WGNO ABC, “The reason Daniel wanted his property to be the tallest was so his wife could look down and snub every 'blue blood' in the cemetery for all eternity." More than a century later, it still holds that distinction.

[h/t Atlas Obscura]