Llama Lovin’

Therapy dogs are so last week. The hip, new animal on the scene is the therapy llama, two of which have been employed by a Washington state rehabilitation center to provide comfort to mostly elderly residents recovering from illness.

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If the llamas aren’t enough, pictures from alpaca shearing day in Germany should do the trick.

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This Rube Goldberg machine music video for A-Trak & Tommy Trash’s “Tuna Melt” spans the whole interior of a house to get from Point A to Point B. Whether or not you’re into electronica, the video is worth watching for the toast dominoes and underwater sequence alone.

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Whoever Oren is, he’s a lucky man: animator Leigh Lahav recreated the opening credits of her husband’s favorite TV shows in an impressively elaborate digital birthday card that makes the most deluxe Hallmark greeting look like scrap paper.

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The New York City Metrocard has been around for about twenty years, but its iconic blue and yellow design might be due for a makeover. Graphic designer Melanie Chernock’s vision for the Metrocard involves more fun colors and fonts for a card that’s as fashionable and functional as the city itself.

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Fun Fact Fox serves up similar content to the Amazing Fact Generator, but from the perspective of a furry friend (or foe, depending on your local wildlife situation).

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How much food can a fiver buy? Depends what (beer, coffee beans, Big Macs) and where (India, France, USA).

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In this series of photos, Slovenian psychologist and amateur photographer Matej Peljhan helps a boy with muscular dystrophy climb, jump, play, and dance.

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

Gaming is a competitive industry, and understanding just programming or just artistry isn’t enough to land a job. The School of Game Design’s lifetime membership is set up to educate you in both fields so your resume and work can stand out.

The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

School of Game Design: Lifetime Membership - $49

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How the Trapper Keeper Trapped the Hearts of '80s and '90s Kids

Courtesy of Cinzia Reale-Castello
Courtesy of Cinzia Reale-Castello

No matter when or where you grew up, back-to-school shopping typically revolved around two things: clothing and school supplies. And if you’re an adult of a certain age, you probably had a Trapper Keeper on that latter list of must-buy items.

Like the stickers, skins, and cases that adorn your smartphones and laptops today, Trapper Keepers were a way for kids to express their individual personalities. The three-ring binders dominated classrooms in the '80s and '90s, and featured a vast array of designs—from colorful Lisa Frank illustrations to photos of cool cars and popular celebrities—that allowed kids to customize their organizational tools. 

In this episode of "Throwback," we're ripping open the Velcro cover and digging into the history of the Trapper Keeper. You can watch the full episode below.

Be sure to head here and subscribe so you don't miss an episode of "Throwback," where we explore the fascinating stories behind some of the greatest toys and trends from your childhood.