Towering 12th-Century Statue Discovered in Angkor Thom

Archaeologists in Cambodia just uncovered a major find in Angkor Thom, the capital of the Khmer empire between the 9th and 15th centuries: a towering statue that may have once guarded an ancient hospital.

According to The Cambodia Daily and Archaeology, the sandstone statue was uncovered on the second day of a recent excavation in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Angkor, which is also home to the famous temple of Angkor Wat.

Found just 16 inches underground, the guard statue likely stood at the entrance to a hospital built by King Jayavarman VII in the 12th century. It is missing parts of its legs and its feet, so it originally would have been just under 7 feet tall. Even incomplete, the statue weighs more than 440 pounds.

King Jayavarman VII built 102 hospitals across his territory, four of which were around the perimeter of Angkor Thom. Though they were discovered by French archaeologists a century ago, excavations of the Angkor Thom hospitals have only recently begun. Largely built with wood, everything of the hospitals but the stone chapels has completely disappeared, leaving only artifacts of hardier materials like stone and ceramics.

Angkor's hundreds of monuments and massive temples make it a huge tourist destination, but it's also a working archaeological site with plenty of understudied areas. This excavation is ongoing and may reveal more relics in the next few weeks. As of August 1, the researchers had already found parts of another statue. 

All images courtesy APSARA National Authority

The New Apple Watch SE Is Now Available on Amazon

Apple/Amazon
Apple/Amazon

Apple products are notorious for their high price tags. From AirPods to iPads to MacBooks, it can be difficult to find the perfect piece of tech on sale when you are ready to buy. Luckily, for those who have had their eye on a new Apple Watch, the Apple Watch SE is designed with all the features users want but at a lower starting price of $279— and they're available on Amazon right now.

The SE exists as a more affordable option when compared to Apple's new Series 6 line of watches. This less expensive version has many of the same functions of its pricier brethren, except for certain features like the blood oxygen sensor and electrical heart sensor. To make up for the truncated bells and whistles, the SE comes in at least $120 cheaper than the Series 6, which starts at $400 and goes up to $800. The SE comes with technical improvements on previous models as well, such as the fall detection, a faster processor, a larger screen, water resistance, and more.

Now available in 40mm ($279) and 44mm ($309), both SE models offer a variety of colors to choose from, such as sliver, space gray, and pink. If you want cellular connection, you’ll have to pay a bit more for the 40mm ($329) and the 44mm ($359).

For more, head to Amazon to see the full list of offerings from Apple.

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Amazing Interactive Map Shows You Which Dinosaurs Roamed Your Neighborhood Millions of Years Ago

Is this midtown Manhattan?
Is this midtown Manhattan?
Orla/iStock via Getty Images

While most of us know that all sorts of prehistoric creatures once inhabited Earth, you might not realize which ones used to wander around your particular city.

Thanks to this interactive map, you can easily find out. Type in your city name, and you’ll see it plotted on the globe, along with a list of species whose fossils have been discovered nearby. If you click on the name of a species, a new webpage will open with details, images, and a map that shows where else that species lived.

Omaha, Nebraska, for example, was once home to the pteranodon, the trinacromerum, and the mosasaurus. Those last two are both marine reptiles, meaning that Nebraska used to be underwater—which the globe will show you, too.

A screenshot of Nebraska from Ian Webster's interactive globe.Dinosaurpictures.org

In addition to searching by city, you can also see what Earth looked like during a specific time period by choosing an option from the dropdown menu at the top. Choices range from 750 million years ago—the Cryogenian period, when glaciers abounded—to 0 million years ago, which is Earth as we know it today. Using a different dropdown menu on the right, you can view Earth during its many notable “firsts,” including “first land plants,” “first dinosaurs,” “first primates,” and more.

As CNN reports, the map was created by California-based paleontologist Ian Webster, who added to an existing model that mapped plate tectonics and used additional data from GPlates, another piece of plate tectonics software.

“It is meant to spark fascination and hopefully respect for the scientists that work every day to better understand our world and its past,” Webster told CNN. “It also contains fun surprises. For example: how the U.S. used to be split by a shallow sea, the Appalachians used to be very tall mountains comparable to the Himalayas, and that Florida used to be submerged.”

You can find other fun surprises by exploring the map yourself here. For the best experience, you'll want to access the site from a desktop computer or tablet versus a smartphone.

[h/t CNN]