On Monday, August 21, North America will be treated to dazzling views of a total solar eclipse. But what if humans lived someplace else in the solar system—would eclipses be regarded with the same excitement and awe as they are here on Earth?

In her new video, Physics Girl Dianna Cowern investigates what these celestial events look like beyond our home planet. She discovers that, on some planets, total solar eclipses aren't even possible. The two moons orbiting Mars, for example, are too small to completely block the Sun. Move on to other parts of the solar system and you'll find places where total eclipses aren't rare at all. On Jupiter, which has 69 moons, it's possible for there to be multiple eclipses occurring at the same time. On Pluto, whose moon appears much larger in its sky than the Sun, total eclipses can happen every day for years on end.

Considering all the factors required to make a perfect solar eclipse, we're pretty lucky to be able to see one from Earth at all. And if you're close enough to the path of totality to view this year's North American eclipse, you can consider yourself even luckier.

[h/t Physics Girl]