You Can See Right Through This Amazing Cockatoo Squid

EVNautilus, Youtube
EVNautilus, Youtube

You've probably never seen a squid quite like the cockatoo squid—or squinted so much to see any squid, for that matter.

As Laughing Squid reports, the Ocean Exploration Trust's Nautilus research ship recently captured impressive footage of the cockatoo squid (Taonius borealis)—also commonly referred to as the "glass squid"—while exploring the deep waters of Juan de Fuca Canyon off the coast of British Columbia's Salish Sea. Why is it called a "cockatoo" squid? The reason for that becomes abundantly clear once you get a closer look at the cephalopod, which sports a head crest that looks oddly similar to a cockatoo's.

As for the story behind its alternate name, that requires even less explanation: Like glass, this deep-sea creature is completely transparent—but that doesn't mean it's lacking in color. The 60-plus known species of cockatoo squids, which are most commonly found in the North Pacific Ocean, all have color-changing chromatophores that allow them to glow a red hue or get spots.

You can watch this amazing creature in action in the video below:

[h/t: Laughing Squid]

20 Weird Clubs That Actually Exist

Mental Floss via YouTube
Mental Floss via YouTube

Groucho Marx once famously quipped that he'd never "want to belong to any club that would accept me as one of its members." Most people would probably say the same about the Martin-Baker Ejection Tie Club—a very exclusive, 63-year-old organization created specifically for individuals who have had their lives saved by an ejection seat. Currently, the club boasts more than 6000 members.

That's just one of the weird and wonderful clubs you'll learn about in our latest edition of The List Show. Join Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy as she hunts down the world's most unusual clubs (Extreme Ironing Bureau anyone?). You can watch the full video below.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here!

Video Captures Fiery Eruption of Mexico's Popocatépetl Volcano

RobertoVaca, iStock via Getty Images
RobertoVaca, iStock via Getty Images

Mexico is home to 48 active volcanoes, but few can compete with Popocatépetl. Located around 40 miles southeast of Mexico City, it's one of the most active volcanoes in the country, and on January 9, the extent of its power was caught on camera.

The video above, reported by NPR, shows the Popocatépetl stratovolcano—also known as a composite volcano—spewing lava, ash, and rock in a fiery plume that reached 20,000 feet above its cinder cone crater. CENAPRED, Mexico's National Center for Disaster Prevention, filmed the volcanic eruption as it unfolded early Thursday morning. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also recorded the explosion from space using its GOES 16 satellite.

No one was hurt by the incident last week, but CENAPRED is warning people to avoid the area as debris continues to fall from the summit. The center has set its Volcanic Warning Light to Yellow Phase 2, which indicates there's no immediate threat of danger.

Since it emerged from dormancy in 1994, Popocatépetl, or "El Popo," as it's known by locals, has become one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico. Tremors and showers of ash are now regular occurrences for residents of nearby towns. Given its volatility, there are currently 20 devices monitoring the volcano 24/7.

[h/t NPR]

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