When it comes to consumer goods, branding is everything. Apple’s little half-chewed fruit logo represents decades of innovation; the Golden Arches promise a reliably consistent fast-service dining experience. But because these logos are so ubiquitous, appearing on everything from cups to boxes, they can use up a tremendous amount of ink, which can have an adverse impact on the environment.

According to Adweek writer Tim Nudd, a solution is out there. Ecobranding, a Paris-based design project, can transform iconic company logos into ink-saving illustrations. By making the McDonald’s arches just slightly less solid, printers could use 34 percent less ink. Putting a little empty space in Nike’s “swoosh” logo would cut its ink usage down by 24 percent.

Courtesy of Ecobranding

Reducing inks on these materials reduces a printer’s environmental footprint by lessening the chemical waste—including airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—created as a result of mass production [PDF]. Better yet, it’s also more economically appealing for companies that print coffee cups or other materials in the millions. Ecobranding is hoping these trial designs will catch the attention of brands looking to conserve resources: Taking a bigger bite out of Apple’s apple could be a win for everyone.

[h/t Adweek]