This Is the Only Way to Go Through a Breakup, According to Science

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iStock

by Reader's Digest Editors

Breaking up is never going to be a painless process, and if it is, you’re probably doing it wrong (i.e. breaking up with someone via Edible Arrangement and then never speaking to them again). 1960s crooner Neil Sedaka summed up the precise difficulty of casting off your significant other in one of his most popular songs, “Breaking Up Is Hard To Do.”

Though it may be difficult, you do have some sort of control over the process—and according to a new study from Brigham Young University and the University of South Alabama, there is a proper way to jettison your lover. It may seem like a no-brainer, but your best bet is to be direct, but with a buffer, according to Men’s Health.

The research involved gathering responses from 145 participants after they were presented with bad news.
 
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The participants were asked to note the most important parts of how the messages were relayed and, across the board, clarity and directness were considered to be the most valued characteristics. These two communicative traits were found to be more important than how considerate or how reasonable the bad news bearer was.

But even though directness was paramount, there still needed to be at least a little bit of a warmup before the bad news when it came to social relationships. “An immediate ‘I’m breaking up with you’ might be too direct,” said lead study author Alan Manning in a press release. “But all you need is a ‘we need to talk’ buffer—just a couple of seconds for the other person to process that bad news is coming.”

So, if you’re breaking up with somebody, allow space for a buffer. But if you’re telling somebody that Santa Claus is dead, the extra padding might not be needed.

Blue Apron’s Memorial Day Sale Will Save You $60 On Your First Three Boxes

Scott Eisen/Getty Images
Scott Eisen/Getty Images

If you’ve gone through all the recipes you had bookmarked on your phone and are now on a first-name basis with the folks at the local pizzeria, it might be time to introduce a new wrinkle into your weekly dinner menu. But instead of buying loads of groceries and cookbooks to make your own meal, you can just subscribe to a service like Blue Apron, which will deliver all the ingredients and instructions you need for a unique dinner.

And if you start your subscription before May 26, you can save $20 on each of your first three weekly boxes from the company. That means that whatever plan you choose—two or four meals a week, vegetarian or the Signature plan—you’ll save $60 in total.

With the company’s Signature plan, you’ll get your choice of meat, fish, and Beyond foods, along with options for diabetes-friendly and Weight Watchers-approved dishes. The vegetarian plan loses the meat, but still allows you to choose from a variety of dishes like General Tso's tofu and black bean flautas.

To get your $60 off, head to the Blue Apron website and click “Redeem Offer” at the top of the page to sign up.

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Do Dogs Get Headaches?

Even without raging benders, dogs might still get headaches.
Even without raging benders, dogs might still get headaches.
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Like babies, dogs can be hard to read in the medical ailment department. Are they listless because they’re tired, or because they’re sick? What’s behind their whining? And can they suffer that most human of debilitating conditions, the headache?

Gizmodo polled several veterinarians and animal behavior specialists to find out, and the answer seems to be a resounding yes.

Although a dog can’t express discomfort in a specific way, particularly if it doesn’t involve limping, animal experts know that canines that have diagnosed brain tumors or encephalitis can also be observed to have a high heart rate, a sign of physical pain. According to Tim Bentley, an associate professor of veterinary neurology and neurosurgery at Purdue Veterinary Medicine, administering painkillers will bring a dog’s heart rate down. If signs of physical distress also decrease, a headache was likely involved.

Unfortunately, not all dogs may offer overt signals they’re feeling some brain pain. According to Adam Boyko, an associate professor of biomedical sciences at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, dogs instinctively try to mask pain to avoid showing weakness.

Ultimately, dogs have many of the same central neural pathways as humans, which can likely go awry in some of the same ways. But the kind of persistent headaches owing to head colds or hangovers are probably rare in dogs. And while it goes without saying, they definitely don't need any of your Advil.

[h/t Gizmodo]