Cook Your Next Out-of-This-World Meal in a Cosmic Le Creuset Dutch Oven

Le Creuset
Le Creuset

Le Creuset, one of the most coveted names in cookware, has given its classic Dutch oven a stellar makeover. As delish reports, the updated item is decorated with the image of a starry night sky.

The pot’s midnight blue exterior is scattered with white and yellow stars. The print, which is known as “cosmos,” is one of the brand’s boldest looks yet.

Le Creuset Dutch ovens have gained a cult following for their durable cast iron hardware and iconic design. The enameled equipment comes in several vibrant colors, including pink, turquoise, and the company’s signature orange.

While Le Creuset has produced patterned pots in the past, they’re usually hard to come by. Earlier this year, it released limited-edition soup pots inspired by Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. This latest product appears to be sticking around for the foreseeable future, but shoppers are still limited in their options. The cosmos look is only available as a 4.5-quart round oven and it's exclusively sold by Bloomingdale's. If you’re looking to gift this to a heavenly home cook in your life, it will cost you $380—about $80 more than a regular Le Creuset oven of the same size.

Space-printed cookware.

Space-printed cookware.

[h/t delish]

84-Year-Old Italian Nonna Is Live-Streaming Pasta-Making Classes From Her Home Outside Rome

beingbonny, iStock via Getty Images
beingbonny, iStock via Getty Images

If you're looking for an entertaining distraction and a way to feed yourself that doesn't involve going outside, sign up for a virtual cooking class. Since the COVID-19 pandemic forced people around the world into isolation, plenty of new remote learning options have appeared on the internet. But few of them feature an 84-year-old Italian nonna teaching you how to make pasta from scratch.

As Broadsheet reports, Nonna Nerina is now hosting pasta-making classes every weekend from her home outside Rome. Before Italy went into lockdown to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus, the home cooking instructor taught her students in person. By moving online, she's able to share her authentic family recipes with people around the world while keeping herself healthy.

Live classes are two hours long and take place during Saturday and Sunday. This weekend, Nonna Nerina is making fettuccine with tomato sauce and cannelloni, though you won't be able to tune in if you haven't signed up yet—the slots are booked up until at least mid-April. If you'd prefer to take your remote cooking lessons during the week, Nerina's granddaughter Chiara hosts pasta-making classes Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays.

Classes cost $50, and you can sign up for them now through the Nonna Nerina website. Here are more educational videos to check out while you're stuck inside.

[h/t Broadsheet]

A Virginia Cinema Owner Is Serving Movie Theater Popcorn Curbside to Keep Paying His Employees

The popular cinema snack is helping fund employees' salaries.
The popular cinema snack is helping fund employees' salaries.
Agustin Vai/iStock via Getty Images

Cinemas are among the many industries that have been hit hard by the novel coronavirus pandemic. With officials urging people to avoid crowds, the only options left for movie fans are streaming services, home collections, and drive-in theaters. University Mall and Cinema Arts in Fairfax, Virginia, are no longer screening films, but in an effort to continue paying employees, their owner is offering another unique movie theater experience: popcorn.

As Variety reports, Mark O’Meara, the 67-year-old owner of both cinemas, has taken his concessions to the curb. Now, customers can drive to the parking lot of the Cinema Arts Theatre and get a large tub of popcorn to go for $3. After rolling out the promotion on March 18, O'Meara made $25 in 45 minutes. Today he's selling roughly $300-to-$400 worth of product a day outside his business.

Money from the popcorn sales is going to the staff members who lost their shifts when University Mall and Cinema Arts were forced to close earlier in March. As O'Meara tells Variety, most of his employees are under 30, and the extra cash is helping them pay their bills at a time when it's unclear when they'll be able to work again.

O'Meara has operated cinemas in Fairfax, Virgina, for nearly three decades. Even though the theaters themselves are closed, loyal patrons are finding other ways to show their support. O'Meara says he's brought in close to a couple thousand dollars in online gift cards since the crisis started. Many independent theaters across the country are depending on this source of income to stay afloat.

[h/t Variety]

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