40 Years Later: Watch The Johnny Cash Christmas Show

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Over the course of his career, Johnny Cash made a series of Christmas TV specials and recorded a string of Christmas records. In this 1977 TV performance, Cash is in great form. He brings special guests Roy Clark, June Carter Cash, The Carter Family, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison ("Pretty Woman" starts around 23:50), Carl Perkins, and the Statler Brothers. Tune in for Christmas as we celebrated it 40 years ago—with gigantic shirt collars, wavy hair, and bow ties. So many bow ties.

A Romantic Toast: Waffle House Is Taking Reservations for Valentine’s Day

For many people, paltry portions of food and a budget-busting restaurant bill can kill the Valentine’s Day mood just as quickly as a nasty bout of the flu. But this year, you can have your pancake and eat it, too—Waffle House is accepting reservations for February 14.

According to Southern Living, the breakfast chain will offer special menu items and even cover its tables with candles and white tablecloths, creating the ideal ambience for romance and giving your nervous hands a free pass to spill syrup everywhere without feeling too bad.

The tradition started back in 2008 at a Waffle House in Johns Creek, Georgia, where an annual rush of couples on Valentine’s Day inspired the manager to embrace the spirit of love and make the restaurant a little more romantic.

February 14 is now the only day you can make a reservation at a Waffle House—after all, an overcrowded foyer full of people waiting for a table doesn’t quite scream “That’s Amore!” A belly full of bacon and waffles, on the other hand, most definitely does.

This year, almost 200 restaurants across 21 states are participating in the promotion. You can find the full list of locations (along with phone numbers to call to make your reservation) here.

And prepare to dazzle your date with 11 fascinating facts about Waffle House here.

[h/t Southern Living]

How Accurate Are Punxsutawney Phil's Groundhog Day Weather Predictions?

Jeff Swensen/Getty Images
Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

On Sunday, February 2, people all across the country will tune in to the biggest spectacle of the season. That’s right—this weekend, Punxsutawney Phil will crawl forth from his tiny tree trunk abode and tell us whether or not to expect six more weeks of winter.

Considering that the legendary groundhog has been predicting the weather since the first Groundhog Day in 1887, it seems safe to assume that he’s gotten pretty good at it by now. The stats, however, indicate that practice doesn’t always make perfect when it comes to mid-sized meteorological rodents. As Live Science reports, the Groundhog Club’s records show that Phil has predicted more winter 103 times, and an early spring just 19. Based on data from the Stormfax Almanac, that means Phil’s accuracy rate is an abysmal 39 percent.

If you only look at weather records dating back to 1969, which are more reliable than earlier accounts, Phil’s job performance review gets even worse: those predictions were correct only 36 percent of the time.

Almost starting to feel sorry for an apparently lousy employee who only has to work for a few minutes each year? According to meteorologist Tim Roche at Weather Underground, Punxsutawney Phil is much more successful when he doesn’t see his shadow.

“Out of the 15 times that he didn’t see his shadow and predicted an early spring, he got it right seven times,” Roche told Live Science. “That’s a 47 percent accuracy rate.”

While Phil is far from infallible, human meteorologists are, too. As National Weather Service meteorologist David Unger told Live Science, “If our forecasts are about 60 percent accurate or higher, then we consider that to be a good estimate.”

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