Iceland is a country known for its glaciers—they cover about 11 percent of the nation's area—so it's a little surprising to hear that most of the ice cooling the country's beverages isn't homegrown. But as a new video from Half as Interesting explains, it's all thanks to the eccentricities of modern economics, in which a country with high domestic labor costs and cheap inbound shipping can buy the cold stuff for less than it takes to harvest it. While it may sound strange, Iceland is one of the highest-income countries in the world, and its isolated, rugged geography means it already relies on imports for many staples. For more on the history of ice as a commodity—and Iceland's unique situation—check out the video below.