Stuff Your Stockings With Mac and Cheese Candy Canes This Holiday Season

iStock
iStock

Classic peppermint isn't interesting enough for some candy cane fans. Archie McPhee has released candy canes that taste like pickles, bacon, and wasabi, and this holiday season, adventurous eaters will have the chance to sample their mac and cheese flavor.

As Delish reports, Archie McPhee, a novelty store based in Seattle, now sells candy canes that taste like the savory comfort food. "Macaroni and Cheese Candy Canes are a particular favorite of picky eaters," the store writes in the product description. "Macaroni and cheese has become a holiday family tradition in many parts of the country, so why not let our holiday candy reflect that?"

Mac and cheese candy cane.
Archie McPhee

The 5.25-inch candies are striped white and instant-cheese-powder-yellow. They come in boxes of six canes, with each box costing $5.95.

If you're looking to stock up on unusual stocking-stuffers ahead of the holidays, Archie McPhee sells a wide variety of off-color candies. They even have seasonally appropriate candy canes for the friends on your naughty lists, with themes like Krampus, coal, and bah, humbug.

[h/t Delish]

America’s 10 Most Hated Easter Candies

Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
Peeps are all out of cluck when it comes to confectionery popularity contests.
William Thomas Cain/Getty Images

Whether you celebrate Easter as a religious holiday or not, it’s an opportune time to welcome the sunny, flora-filled season of spring with a basket or two of your favorite candy. And when it comes to deciding which Easter-themed confections belong in that basket, people have pretty strong opinions.

This year, CandyStore.com surveyed more than 19,000 customers to find out which sugary treats are widely considered the worst. If you’re a traditionalist, this may come as a shock: Cadbury Creme Eggs, Peeps, and solid chocolate bunnies are the top three on the list, and generic jelly beans landed in the ninth spot. While Peeps have long been polarizing, it’s a little surprising that the other three classics have so few supporters. Based on some comments left by participants, it seems like people are just really particular about the distinctions between certain types of candy.

Generic jelly beans, for example, were deemed old and bland, but people adore gourmet jelly beans, which were the fifth most popular Easter candy. Similarly, people thought Cadbury Creme Eggs were messy and low-quality, while Cadbury Mini Eggs—which topped the list of best candies—were considered inexplicably delicious and even “addictive.” And many candy lovers prefer hollow chocolate bunnies to solid ones, which people explained were simply “too much.” One participant even likened solid bunnies to bricks.

candystore.com's worst easter candies
The pretty pastel shades of bunny corn don't seem to be fooling the large contingent of candy corn haters.
CandyStore.com

If there’s one undeniable takeaway from the list of worst candies, it’s that a large portion of the population isn’t keen on chewy marshmallow treats in general. The eighth spot went to Hot Tamales Peeps, and Brach’s Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits—which one person christened “the zombie bunny catacomb statue candy”—sits at number six.

Take a look at the full list below, and read more enlightening (and entertaining) survey comments here.

  1. Cadbury Creme Eggs
  1. Peeps
  1. Solid chocolate bunnies
  1. Bunny Corn
  1. Marshmallow Chicks & Rabbits
  1. Chocolate crosses
  1. Twix Eggs
  1. Hot Tamales Peeps
  1. Generic jelly beans
  1. Fluffy Stuff Cotton Tails

[h/t CandyStore.com]

5 Fast Facts About the Spring Equinox

paprikaworks/iStock via Getty Images
paprikaworks/iStock via Getty Images

Spring starts on March 19—the earliest it has ever arrived in 124 years—which means that warmer weather and longer days are just around the corner. To celebrate the spring equinox, here are some facts about the event.

1. The spring equinox arrives at 11:49 p.m. Eastern Time.

The first day of spring is March 19, 2020, but the spring equinox will only be here for a brief time. At 11:49 p.m. Eastern Time, the Sun will be perfectly in line with the equator, which results in both the northern and southern hemispheres receiving equal amounts of sunlight throughout the day. After the vernal equinox has passed, days will start to become shorter for the Southern Hemisphere and longer up north.

2. The Equinox isn't the only time you can balance an egg.

You may have heard the myth that you can balance an egg on its end during the vernal equinox, and you may have even tried the experiment in school. The idea is that the extra gravitational pull from the Sun when it's over the equator helps the egg stand up straight. While it is possible to balance an egg, the trick has nothing to do with the equinox: You can make an egg stand on its end by setting it on a rough surface any day of the year.

3. Not every place gets equal night and day.

The equal night and day split between the northern and southern hemispheres isn't distributed evenly across all parts of the world. Though every region gets approximately 12 hours of sunlight the day of the vernal equinox, some places get a little more (the day is about 12 hours and 14 minutes in Fairbanks, Alaska), and some get less.

4. The word equinox means "equal night."

The word equinox literally translates to equal ("equi") and night ("nox") in Latin. The term vernal means "new and fresh," and comes from the Latin word vernus for "of spring."

5. In 2020, Spring is arriving earlier than it has in 124 years.

If March 19 seems a little early for the first day of spring, you're right. Typically, March 21 has marked the first day of spring (though it arrived on March 20 in 2019). But the 2020 vernal equinox's arrival just before midnight means that this is the earliest spring has arrived in quite a while—124 years to be exact.

According to The Farmers' Almanac, there are several factors that can affect the date of spring's arrival: the number of days in a year, a change in orientation in the Earth's elliptical orbit, and the pull of gravity from the other planets.

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