Dunkin’ and Harpoon Brewery Launch a Coffee Porter For Fall

Dunkin'/Harpoon Brewery
Dunkin'/Harpoon Brewery

Dunkin’ and the Boston-based Harpoon Brewery have teamed up to combine two of America’s favorite beverages: coffee and beer. Perfect for providing an extra energy boost before your football watch party kicks off, the Harpoon Dunkin’ Coffee Porter is now available at select retail locations in the eastern U.S. through autumn.

The recipe takes the brewery’s classic craft beer and infuses it with Dunkin’s Espresso Blend, which features 100 percent Arabica beans sourced from Central and South America. The beer has an alcohol-by-volume content of 6 percent and is said to have a smooth, roasty taste and “aromas of espresso and dark chocolate.”

You could drink it as a standalone dessert or pair it with a hearty stew or sweet treat, per the company's recommendations. As The Boston Globe reports, Dunkin’ previously created a beer in collaboration with Wormtown Brewery, but it was sold exclusively at the brewer’s taproom in Worcester, Massachusetts. This is the first Dunkin'-infused beer that is widely available in the eastern U.S.

Coffee stouts, like pumpkin beers, tend to be divisive. Still, they're popular enough that many brewers across the country offer them each fall. Some of Harpoon Brewery's other seasonal offerings include a Hibiscus Cider, Imperial Pumpkin stout, and "Flannel Friday" amber ale.

Amazon Customers Are Swearing by a $102 Mattress

Linenspa
Linenspa

Before you go out and spend hundreds—if not thousands—of dollars on a new mattress, you may want to turn to Amazon. According to Esquire, one of the most comfortable mattresses on the market isn’t from Tempur-Pedic, Casper, or IKEA. It’s a budget mattress you can buy on Amazon for as little as $102.

Linenspa's 8-inch memory foam and innerspring hybrid mattress has more than 24,000 customer reviews on Amazon, and 72 percent of those buyers gave it five stars. The springs are topped by memory foam and a quilted top layer that make it, according to one customer, a “happy medium of both firm and plush.”

Linenspa

Perhaps because of its cheap price point, many people write that they first purchased it for their children or their guest room, only to find that it far exceeded their comfort expectations. One reviewer who bought it for a guest room wrote that “it is honestly more comfortable than the expensive mattress we bought for our room.” Pretty impressive for a bed that costs less than some sheet sets.

Getting a good night's sleep is vital for your health and happiness, so do yourself a favor and make sure your snooze is as comfortable as possible.

The mattress starts at $102 for a twin and goes up to $200 for a king. Check it out on Amazon.

[h/t Esquire]

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Why Are Decaf Coffee Pots Orange?

If you're looking for a caffeine fix, you know that orange pot isn't going to help.
If you're looking for a caffeine fix, you know that orange pot isn't going to help.
RonBailey/iStock via Getty Images

The orange spout and handle on a decaf coffee pot have saved many caffeine lovers from having a terrible morning. Like the orange on a traffic cone, the color has become a signal both to the people who drink coffee and the servers who pour it. But the shade wasn't merely chosen for its eye-catching qualities; orange is a piece of branding left over from the original purveyors of decaf java.

According to The Cubiclist, decaffeinated coffee first arrived in America via the German company Sanka. Sanka (a portmanteau of the words sans and caffeine) sold its coffee in stores in glass jars with orange labels. The bright packaging was the company's calling card, and because it was the first decaffeinated coffee brand to hit the market, consumers started looking for the color when shopping for decaf.

In 1932, General Foods, which has since merged with Kraft, purchased Sanka and got to work promoting it. To spread the word about decaf coffee, the company sent orange Sanka coffee pots to coffee shops and restaurants around the country. Even if the waitstaff wasn't used to serving two types of coffee, the distinct color of the pot made it easy to distinguish decaf from regular.

The plan was such a success that orange eventually became synonymous not just with Sanka, but all decaf coffee. Other coffeemakers began offering decaffeinated alternatives, and when marketing their products, they chose the color Sanka had already made popular.

The reason for the orange coffee pot is just one of decaf's not-so-mysterious mysteries. Here's some of the science behind how exactly coffee makers get the caffeine out of the beans.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.