Original Drawings by J.R.R. Tolkien Are Coming to New York's Morgan Library

The Tolkien Estate Limited 1937
The Tolkien Estate Limited 1937

A collection of British fantasy writer J.R.R. Tolkien's original drawings and illustrations will make a rare appearance in the U.S. this month. As AM New York reports, works from the University of Oxford's Bodleian Libraries will be traveling across the pond to New York City, where they'll go on display at The Morgan Library & Museum.

From January 25 to May 12, 2019, visitors to the "Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth" exhibition will have the chance to see book manuscripts, hand-drawn maps of Middle-earth, original illustrations of Smaug the dragon (from The Hobbit), Sauron's Dark Tower of Barad-dûr (described in The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion), and other recognizable characters. Seldom-seen childhood photos of Tolkien, who would have celebrated his 127th birthday on January 3, will also be on view.

"The Morgan exhibition is your only opportunity in America to see the largest collection ever assembled of J.R.R. Tolkien's original drawings, manuscripts, and maps," Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan Library, says in a video promoting the exhibition.

It's not all about the art, either. Tolkien's draft manuscripts provide a window into his creative process, as well as the vivid, expansive worlds he created. "We get a glimpse into the moments in the creation of the narrative, such as when he changes the wizard's name to Gandalf or suddenly comes up with the idea of the One Ring," library curator John McQuillen tells AM New York.

In addition to items from the Bodleian Libraries, the Morgan also borrowed works from the Marquette University Libraries in Milwaukee and private lenders. In total, there are 117 items on display. The exhibit typically costs $20, but it's free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m.

If you aren't able to make it to New York for this exhibition, you can check out some of Tolkien's illustrations in the Bodleian Libraries' book of the same name, Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth. Hardcover copies are available on Amazon for $29.

[h/t AM New York]

Kids Can Join Children's Book Author Mo Willems for Daily "Lunch Doodles" on YouTube

Screenshot via YouTube
Screenshot via YouTube

For children interested in taking drawing lessons, there are few better teachers than Mo Willems. The bestselling author and illustrator has been charming young readers for years with his Pigeon picture book series. Now, from the Kennedy Center, where he's currently the artist-in-residence, Willems is hosting daily "Lunch Doodles" videos that viewers can take part in wherever they are. New lessons are posted to the Kennedy Center's YouTube channel each weekday at 1:00 p.m. EST.

With the novel coronavirus outbreak closing schools across the country, many kids are now expected to continue their education from home. For the next several weeks, Willems will be sharing his time and talents with bored kids (and their overworked parents) in the form of "Lunch Doodles" episodes that last anywhere from 15 to 30 minutes. In the videos, Willems demonstrates drawing techniques, shares insights into his process, and encourages kids to come up with stories to go along with their creations.

"With millions of learners attempting to grow and educate themselves in new circumstances, I have decided to invite everyone into my studio once a day for the next few weeks," Willems writes for the center's blog. "Grab some paper and pencils, pens, or crayons. We are going to doodle together and explore ways of writing and making."

If kids don't want to doodle during lunch, the videos will remain on YouTube for them to tune in at any time. The Kennedy Center is also publishing downloadable activity pages to go with each episode on its website [PDF]. For more ways to entertain children in quarantine or isolation, check out these livestreams from zoos, cultural institutions, and celebrities.

Dreaming of Your Favorite City? This Website Will Create a Personalized Haiku Poem About It for You

OpenStreetMap Haiku will capture the colorful character of your hometown in a few (possibly silly) phrases.
OpenStreetMap Haiku will capture the colorful character of your hometown in a few (possibly silly) phrases.
vladystock/iStock via Getty Images

You no longer need to spend all your free time struggling to capture the vibe of your favorite city in a few carefully chosen syllables—OpenStreetMap Haiku will do it for you.

The site, developed by Satellite Studio, uses the information from crowdsourced global map OpenStreetMap to create a haiku that describes any location in the world. According to Travel + Leisure, the poems are based on data points like supermarkets, shops, local air quality, weather, time of day, and more.

“Looking at every aspect of the surroundings of a point, we can generate a poem about any place in the world,” the developers wrote in a blog post. “The result is sometimes fun, often weird, most of the time pretty terrible. Also probably horrifying for haiku purists (sorry).”

The results are also often waggishly accurate. For example, here’s a haiku describing Washington, D.C.:

“The same pot of coffee
Fresh coffee from Starbucks
The desk clerk.”

In other words, it seems like the city runs on compulsive coffee refills and paperwork. And if you thought life in Brooklyn, New York, was a combination of alcohol-fueled outings to basement bars and traffic-filled trips into the city, this poem probably confirms your suspicions:

“Getting drunk at The Nest
Today in New York
Green. Red. Green. Red.”

The website’s creators were inspired by Naho Matsuda’s Every Thing Every Time, a 2018 art installation outside Theatre Royal in Newcastle, England, that used data points to generate an ever-changing poem about the city.

Wondering what OpenStreetMap Haiku has to say about your hometown? Explore the map here.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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