Original Drawings by J.R.R. Tolkien Are Coming to New York's Morgan Library

The Tolkien Estate Limited 1937
The Tolkien Estate Limited 1937

A collection of British fantasy writer J.R.R. Tolkien's original drawings and illustrations will make a rare appearance in the U.S. this month. As AM New York reports, works from the University of Oxford's Bodleian Libraries will be traveling across the pond to New York City, where they'll go on display at The Morgan Library & Museum.

From January 25 to May 12, 2019, visitors to the "Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth" exhibition will have the chance to see book manuscripts, hand-drawn maps of Middle-earth, original illustrations of Smaug the dragon (from The Hobbit), Sauron's Dark Tower of Barad-dûr (described in The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion), and other recognizable characters. Seldom-seen childhood photos of Tolkien, who would have celebrated his 127th birthday on January 3, will also be on view.

"The Morgan exhibition is your only opportunity in America to see the largest collection ever assembled of J.R.R. Tolkien's original drawings, manuscripts, and maps," Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan Library, says in a video promoting the exhibition.

It's not all about the art, either. Tolkien's draft manuscripts provide a window into his creative process, as well as the vivid, expansive worlds he created. "We get a glimpse into the moments in the creation of the narrative, such as when he changes the wizard's name to Gandalf or suddenly comes up with the idea of the One Ring," library curator John McQuillen tells AM New York.

In addition to items from the Bodleian Libraries, the Morgan also borrowed works from the Marquette University Libraries in Milwaukee and private lenders. In total, there are 117 items on display. The exhibit typically costs $20, but it's free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m.

If you aren't able to make it to New York for this exhibition, you can check out some of Tolkien's illustrations in the Bodleian Libraries' book of the same name, Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth. Hardcover copies are available on Amazon for $29.

[h/t AM New York]

These Amazing Jigsaw Puzzles Feature Artworks by Female Artists From Around the World

JIGGY
JIGGY

There are many different reasons why people might choose a traditional jigsaw puzzle over Candy Crush, Untitled Goose Game, or another smartphone-optimized activity. There’s a tactile satisfaction in the process of fitting the pieces together that you don’t necessarily get from the smooth surface of your phone, for one. It’s also something you can enjoy with a group.

For Kaylin Marcotte, it was a way to unwind at night after seemingly endless days working as theSkimm’s very first employee. Though the low-tech nature of jigsaw puzzling was part of the appeal, she didn’t see why the designs themselves needed to be quite so old-fashioned. So she decided to found her own puzzling company, JIGGY.

This week, JIGGY debuted its first collection, featuring artworks from emerging global female artists. If you’re thinking en vogue modern art sounds like just the thing to fill your blank wall space, Marcotte agrees: The puzzles come with puzzle glue and even a custom precision tool to help you apply it smoothly, so you can frame and hang your creation after completion. If you’re more of a puzzle repeater than a puzzle displayer, that’s fine, too—just pop the pieces back into their sustainable glass container until next time.

The contributing artists hail from all over the world, and each artwork embodies a distinctive style. “Bathing with Flowers” by Slovenia’s Alja Horvat depicts a lush tropical atmosphere, while “BerlinMagalog” by Diana Ejaita (based in Germany and Nigeria) combines bold contrasts with soft patterns to capture the complexity of feminine strength.

jiggy puzzle bathing with flowers
"Bathing with Flowers" by Alja Horvat.
JIGGY

JIGGY puzzle “BerlinMagalog” by Diana Ejaita
“BerlinMagalog” by Diana Ejaita.
JIGGY

In Australia-based Karen Lynch’s “Flamingo Playground,” a building-sized flamingo innocuously stalks across a picturesque, populated beach. And then there’s “The Astronaut” by Seattle’s Emma Repp, a whimsical, vibrant illustration of outer space that brilliantly contrasts the bleak and sometimes terrifying abyss we’re so used to seeing in movies like Gravity (2013) or First Man (2018).

JIGGY puzzle “Flamingo Playground,”
"Flamingo Playground" by Karen Lynch.
JIGGY

JIGGY puzzle “The Astronaut”
“The Astronaut” by Emma Repp.
JIGGY

The full collection comprises three 450-piece puzzles for $40 each, and three 800-piece puzzles for $48 each—you can find out more about the artists and shop for your favorite puzzle here.

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This Massachusetts Home Painted by Norman Rockwell Just Hit the Market

Wayne Tremblay
Wayne Tremblay

Norman Rockwell is considered one of the 20th century’s great American artists. Using his keen eye for capturing domestic America, his work—which often appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post—has become instantly recognizable, and his originals sell for millions.

If you can’t afford a Rockwell, perhaps you might be able to move into one of his inspirations. A home featured in his 1967 painting Stockbridge Main Street at Christmas has come up for sale in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

A home in Stockbridge, Massachusetts painted by Norman Rockwell is pictured
Wayne Tremblay

The three-story, 8770-square foot Victorian has an entry-level storefront, one depicted as an antiques shop in the painting and currently being occupied by a real estate office and gift shop. The second floor is spaced for residence, and a third floor can be rented out, as well.

The entire street has echoes of Rockwell. He once had a studio a few doors down. Every Christmas, the town tries to harken back to the painting by parking vintage cars along the road.

Listed by William Pitt Sotheby's International Reality, it can be yours for $1,795,000. The painting has not come up for sale—it resides in the nearby Norman Rockwell Museum—but if it did, you could expect to pay substantially more. Another Rockwell, Saving Grace, sold for a record $46 million in 2013.

[h/t Boston.com]

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