This Service Will Deal With the Logistical Side of Your Breakup for $99

iStock.com/LightFieldStudios
iStock.com/LightFieldStudios

In the aftermath of a breakup, it can be hard to do anything but watch sad movies and eat ice cream in bed. But your broken heart isn't the only thing that needs attention when a relationship ends: If you shared a living space with your ex, you'll also have to deal with finding a different place to live, moving out, and furnishing your new space. Fortunately, the newly single don't have to navigate this process alone. As Fast Company reports, Onward is a new concierge service based in New York City that handles the practical aspects of a breakup so you can focus on recovery.

Onward wants clients to see breaking up as an opportunity to start a new phase of life, and to get you started on that path, they begin by finding you a new, temporary place to live. The service has connections with furnished, short-term rental options in the city that are ready for new tenants. The utilities and paperwork have already been figured out for you, so all you need to worry about is moving in. Onward will send over packers and movers to help you move out of your old place and move on with your life as quickly as possible.

If you're having trouble processing your emotions after a breakup, Onward offers support in that area as well. Instead of weeding through tons of therapists on your own, the service narrows down your options to one to three vetted mental health professionals within your insurance network in just 24 hours. A 10-day package from Onward, which includes housing placement, packing, moving, and mental healthcare search assistance, starts at $99.

Onward's services couldn't come at a better time—the number of U.S. adults in cohabiting relationships rose from 14 million to 18 million between 2007 and 2016. That means many couples who break up have to deal with the same complications of divorce without the legal guidance. And finding a new place to live can be expensive, which keeps many people from moving on: According to one survey, 28 percent of people cite financial security as a reason for staying with their current partner.

Services like Onward can not only help the recently dumped, but also those who have been putting off pulling the plug on an unsatisfying relationship. You can sign up for their service after answering a few questions on their website.

[h/t Fast Company]

Tom Brady Makes Nearly $1.5 Million Per Hour of Playtime—Which Is Only a Fraction of the NFL’s Highest Paid Quarterbacks’ Earnings

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady during the AFC Wild Card Playoff game in January 2020.
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady during the AFC Wild Card Playoff game in January 2020.
Elsa/Getty Images

Each week during football season, NFL quarterbacks face heaps of high-stakes pressure as millions tune in to watch them try to lead their teams to victory—or at least avoid getting blamed for bad passes. It’s by no means an easy job, but at least it pays well.

To find out just how well, AT&T affiliate All Home Connections analyzed the salaries and playing times of all the first-string quarterbacks from the 2018 NFL season. Even if you knew they were raking in piles of cash for every second they spent on the field, you might not have realized just how much.

If you’re looking for ways to justify despising Tom Brady, here’s one: He earns about $1.5 million for every hour of playtime. However, as any devoted New England Patriots fan will tell you, Brady is far from the highest-earning quarterback in the league, and he’s accepted lower base salaries throughout his career so the Patriots can use that extra money to build a championship-winning team around him.

When it comes to playtime earnings, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo beat Tom Brady and every other quarterback by millions—he landed in first place with an average of more than $27.6 million per hour on the field. Compared to Garoppolo, the $8.8 million of runner-up Aaron Rodgers practically seems like pocket change. Most of the other quarterbacks earn somewhere between $1 million and $4 million per hour of playtime.

Part of the reason it looks like Garoppolo out-earned his peers so spectacularly is because his total playtime for the 2018 season was much lower than everyone else’s, due to a knee injury he suffered during the third game of the season. For this study, All Home Connections added up each quarterback’s total number of snaps and multiplied it by their offense’s average seconds per play to estimate their overall playing time. Then, they divided that number by the quarterback’s 2018 salary. Since Garoppolo’s overall playing time was only about 1.5 hours, he got more buck for his bang. Brady, by comparison, clocked about 10 hours of playtime during 2018.

See the full breakdown here, and get ready for Super Bowl LIV with these fascinating Super Bowl facts.

[h/t All Home Connections]

The Two Types of Millennials, and the Differences Between Them

undefined undefined / iStock via Getty Images
undefined undefined / iStock via Getty Images

Though often described in blanket terms, each Millennial's experience varies greatly. And it isn't just their age ranges and relationships to technology that divide the generation. According to one expert, American Millennials (anyone born between the years 1981 and 1996) fall into two subgroups based on their levels of success: "me-llennials" and "mega-llennials."

Center for Generational Kinetics president Jason Dorsey, who researches Millennials, told Business Insider that life paths and financial status may be a better indicator of the differences in members of this generation than the years they were born. According to him, the first group feels behind in their careers and other areas of adult life, while the second group feels right on track.

For the first group, he coined the term "me-llennials." These are Millennials who fit the common narrative surrounding the generation: They're dealing with stagnant wages and career paths, unaffordable housing, and mountains of student loan debt. The homeownership rate of Millennials today is 8 percent lower than that of Baby Boomers at the same age. National student loan debt, meanwhile, reached a record high of $1.5 trillion in 2019.

Millennials belonging to the second group are at a much different place in life. These so-called "mega-llennials" manage their bills, feel satisfied with their careers, and are overall more financially stable than other members of their generation. For these reasons, mega-llennials may not relate to the typical millennial experience that's often reported.

These trends indicate that the story of Millennials' progress is more complicated than it may seem. While the combination of steep bills and low wages may be worse for young people today than it was for older generations, the Millennials who aren't dealing with those hardships have an even greater advantage over their peers. The gap between these subgroups will only get wider: Millennials are set to inherit trillions in wealth over the coming decades.

[h/t Business Insider]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER