Thrift Stores Are Seeing a Surge in Donations, Thanks to Netflix's Tidying Up With Marie Kondo

Denise Crew, Netflix
Denise Crew, Netflix

If you've recently been asking yourself “Does this spark joy?” about the many items in your home, you've probably been bitten by the Marie Kondo bug. You're not alone. The organizing consultant’s Netflix show, Tidying Up with Marie Kondo, has become a major hit for the streaming network—and has left viewers feeling the sudden urge to clean out their closets. As a result, thrift stores are feeling the "Kondo Effect," too.

As People reports, Goodwill Stores have been inundated with clothes, furniture, and other pre-loved items ever since Kondo’s Netflix series premiered on January 1. In the show, Kondo teaches families how to tidy up their houses and organize their belongings by category, including clothes, books, papers, sentimental items, and komono (miscellaneous things).

“We know that a number of our community-based Goodwill organizations have seen a year-over-year spike in donations in January that they attribute to Marie Kondo’s show,” Lauren Lawson-Zilai, a Goodwill representative, told People.

The spike is hard to quantify because Goodwill’s stores are run by 161 independent organizations across the country. However, a number of individual branches have reported that donations are way up. Branches in Houston, Washington, D.C.; Grand Rapids, Michigan; and Roanoke, Virginia all saw surges of between 16 and 30 percent in January.

That might not seem like a significant amount, but a 3 percent increase in donations to Tampa Bay area stores translated to an extra 5 million pounds of donations being processed in a single month. Other factors may also be responsible for the uptick in donations—like warmer weather in some areas, or New Year’s resolutions—but the Kondo craze is still driving much of the decluttering.

Other nonprofit organizations and thrift stores have also seen an increase in donated goods, including some Salvation Army outlets and stores operated by Volunteers of America Ohio & Indiana.

“The Tidying Up craze has struck a chord with people of all ages,'' Debbie Gillum of Volunteers of America told Cleveland.com. "People are starting to ask themselves what in their homes sparks joy and they are donating things that no longer bring them joy. The best part is when they donate their stuff, it can bring joy to someone else.”

[h/t People]

Sesame Workshop Shares New Resources and Activities to Help Parents and Kids Cope With Self-Isolation

Elmo and Abby search for the color green at the beach.
Elmo and Abby search for the color green at the beach.
Sesame Street, YouTube

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind Sesame Street, is enlisting Elmo, Oscar the Grouch, and the rest of your favorite puppets to help parents and children cope with life at home during the coronavirus pandemic.

In addition to existing content from the show about health and wellness, the “Caring for Each Other” initiative will feature new material that covers topics like hand-washing, proper protocol for coughing or sneezing, and the relationship between taking good care of yourself and taking good care of others.

“Around the world, young children’s lives are being turned upside down, and parents and caregivers are looking for ways to give their children—and themselves—a sense of stability in this new normal,” Dr. Rosemarie Truglio, Sesame Workshop’s senior vice president for curriculum and content, said in a press release. “But there are things parents and caregivers can do to face each day with optimism. Sesame Street is here to provide the caring adults in children’s lives with the resources they need to help children, and foster their healthy development at home.”

On the “Caring for Each Other” landing site, there are documents to help parents navigate talking to their children about COVID-19, creating routines for “The For-Now Normal,” and more. There are also printable coloring pages with spot-the-difference images, step-by-step drawing instructions, and mazes.

The beloved Sesame Street characters appear often throughout the content, including in videos like “Elmo’s Virtual Hug” and the “Big Feelings” song. Plus, there’s a curated YouTube playlist of “Fun at Home Activities” with directions for DIY sock puppets and drums, “Monster Yoga” poses, and other Sesame Street clips.

You can explore the offerings here, and subscribe to the Sesame Street newsletter for updates.

20 Boredom-Busting Science Experiments You Can Do at Home, Courtesy of YouTube’s Physics Girl

YouTube's Physics Girl snuffs out a candle with carbon dioxide.
YouTube's Physics Girl snuffs out a candle with carbon dioxide.
Physics Girl, YouTube

YouTube sensation Physics Girl is keeping boredom at bay in the best way possible: with DIY science experiments that you can recreate on your own.

In the video below, she challenges herself to complete all 20 experiments in five minutes—not including the time it takes to set everything up—which amounts to 15 seconds for each one. Parents who are homeschooling their kids (or adults who just have a little more free time than usual while in self-isolation) can, of course, slow them down to a more leisurely pace or even spread them out over a few weeks.

You probably already have a lot of the materials you’ll need, like eggs, candles, soda cans, oil, water, pans, and other basic household items. Some experiments are simple and kid-safe—like spinning a hard-boiled egg on its side until it stands on its end—while others require adult supervision, like blowing out a candle and relighting it without actually touching the lighter to the wick.

A few of them might end up entertaining kids (or you) for much longer than the duration of the experiment itself. A mixture of cornstarch and tonic water, for example, creates a slime-like substance called a non-Newtonian fluid, meaning it can act like a solid or a liquid, depending on how you handle it. (If you don’t have tonic water, here’s how to make it with regular water.)

And after you’ve mastered all the challenges and spent hours letting cornstarch slime run through your fingers at various viscosities, there are many more wonders to behold on Physics Girl’s YouTube channel, which is run by PBS Digital Studios. There, the MIT graduate (also known as Dianna Cowern) explores why Tic Tacs sometimes bounce higher on the second bounce, investigates whether it’s possible to power a house with a ShakeWeight, and plenty more.

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