10 Unusual Easter Candies You Can Buy Online in Time for the Holiday

iStock.com/bhofack2
iStock.com/bhofack2

You may have heard the news that Cadbury Creme Eggs, pastel-colored candy corn, and marshmallow Peeps are the most-hated Easter candies, according to the results of a recent survey. But what about zombie chocolate bunnies, sparkly "Bunny Corn," and Pancakes and Syrup Peeps? If you’re hoping to fill a basket with some alternative candies this Easter—if for no other purpose than to prank your kids or significant other—then this is the list for you. Here are 10 weird and wonderful sweets that are for sale online right now (some of them in bulk!), from macabre chocolates to oddly flavored jelly beans.

1. Bunny’s Berries

Bunny's Berries candy

FancyPants FunTime, Amazon

Mmm … bunny droppings. The Bunny's Berries package claims that there’s “a little bit of poop in every bite”—but at least they taste like tropical fruit. The speckled candies come from the same company that makes “Santa’s Surprise” and “Unicorn Poop,” all of which make great gag gifts for friends, family, or coworkers with a sense of humor.

Buy them on Amazon for $8.

2. Unicorn Barf

Unicorn Barf cotton candy

Unicornucopia, Amazon

While we’re still discussing the bodily functions of adorable animals, let us offer another treat that kids will love: Unicorn Barf. This magical tub of cotton candy lets you “retaste the rainbow.” More specifically, the colors correspond with six flavors: cherry, peach, pineapple, lime, blueberry, and grape.

Buy it on Amazon for $10.

3. Sparkling Bunny Corn

Bunny Corn
Jelly Belly, Amazon

Candy corn in all its forms tends to generate strong reactions. But even if you hate the sugary nuggets, you have to admit that these sparkly “Bunny Corn” candies would look pretty sitting in a decorative dish on your table.

Buy it from Jelly Belly for $7 on Amazon for $9 per 7.5-ounce bag.

4. Pancakes and Syrup Peeps

Pancakes and syrup-flavored Peeps

Peeps & Company, Amazon

If you love all things marshmallow, you might want to try some of the stranger Peeps varieties on offer, like the limited-edition pancakes and syrup flavor. One reviewer recommends freezing them, while another swears that they taste like the “creme brûlée of marshmallows” when roasted over an open fire. If you’re really feeling bold, you can get them in a variety pack that also comes with Peeps that taste like cotton candy, party cake, and root beer floats.

Buy them on Amazon for $5 for 20 chicks or from the Peeps online store for $2 per 10-pack.

5. Chocolate Zombie Bunnies

Zombie bunny chocolates

J&J Chocolates, Etsy

Blood-covered zombie bunnies might seem too gruesome for an Easter basket, but then again, there is a popular children’s book about a vampire rabbit (remember Bunnicula?). These hand-painted confections from J&J Chocolates come in your choice of milk, white, or dark chocolate.

Buy it on Etsy for $7.

6. Cadbury Screme Eggs

A Cadbury Screme Egg
Cadbury, Amazon

These are more of a Halloween novelty, but if you’re feeling a little ornery, you can hand them out at Easter, too. If someone bites into the egg without reading the label, they might be shocked to discover that the fondant in the center is green, not white and yellow.

Buy them on Amazon for $20 for a pack of 42.

7. Purple Rain Tiny Jelly Bird Eggs

Brach's Purple Rain jelly beans

Brach's, Amazon

Finally: An Easter candy created specifically for Prince fans who also happen to like berry-flavored jelly beans. It’s a niche product, but we’re still happy it exists. These beans come in four flavors: mixed berry, blueberry, blue raspberry, and grape.

Buy them on Amazon for $28 for three bags.

8. Sour Patch Bunnies

Sour Patch Bunnies
Sour Patch, Walmart

Sour Patch Kids were already a pretty popular candy, but you can now enjoy an Easter-themed version of these tart treats. Bunnies have replaced the original candy shape for a limited time. More bizarrely, Sour Patch Kids Marshmallows have been spotted at some Walmart stores this year, but they don’t appear to be available online at the moment.

Buy the Sour Patch Bunnies from Walmart for $1 per 3.1-ounce box or on Amazon for $11 for 12 boxes.

9. Ice Cream-Flavored Starburst Jellybeans

Starburst ice cream jellybeans
Starburst, Target

If you love Starbursts and ice cream, you’ll probably love these jelly beans. They come in strawberry, orange sherbet, red raspberry, and lemon sorbet flavors. Despite the creamy taste, they maintain the candy's classic chewy texture, according to Target.

Buy them from Target for $3 per bag or on Amazon for $6.

10. Bunny-Shaped Reese's Puffs Cereal

Reeses's Puff Bunnies

Reese's, Walmart

OK, so this one is a bit of an outlier, but it’s certainly sweet enough to pass for candy. General Mills has replaced the cereal’s eponymous puffs with chocolatey and peanut buttery bunnies just in time for the holiday. Could there be a more suitable breakfast for Easter morning?

Buy it from Walmart for $4.

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What's the Difference Between Stuffing and Dressing?

iStock
iStock

For carbohydrate lovers, nothing completes a Thanksgiving meal quite like stuffing—shovelfuls of bread, celery, mushrooms, and other ingredients that complement all of that turkey protein.

Some people don’t say stuffing, though. They say dressing. In these calamitous times, knowing how to properly refer to the giant glob of insulin-spiking bread seems necessary. So what's the difference?

Let’s dismiss one theory off the bat: Dressing and stuffing do not correlate with how the side dish is prepared. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, and stuffing can be served in a casserole dish. Whether it’s ever seen the inside of a bird is irrelevant, and anyone who tells you otherwise is wrong and should be met with suspicion, if not outright derision.

The terms are actually separated due to regional dialects. Dressing seems to be the favored descriptor for southern states like Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Georgia, while stuffing is preferred by Maine, New York, and other northern areas. (Some parts of Pennsylvania call it filling, which is a bit too on the nose, but to each their own.)

If stuffing stemmed from the common practice of filling a turkey with carbs, why the division? According to HuffPost, it may have been because Southerners considered the word stuffing impolite, and therefore never embraced it.

While you should experience no material difference in asking for stuffing or dressing, when visiting relatives it might be helpful to keep to their regionally-preferred word to avoid confusion. Enjoy stuffing yourselves.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

The Reason You Should Never Rinse a Turkey

jax10289/iStock via Getty Images
jax10289/iStock via Getty Images

There are many misconceptions surrounding your Thanksgiving turkey, but none is more dangerous than the turkey-washing myth. Raw poultry can contain dangerous microbes like Salmonella, and it's not uncommon for home cooks to rinse their meat under cool water in an effort to wash away these pathogens. The intention may be admirable, but this is a worse turkey sin than overcooking your bird or carving it before letting it rest. According to AOL, rinsing a raw turkey with water is more likely to make you and your dinner guests sick than not cleaning it at all.

When you wash a turkey in the sink, there's no guarantee that all of the nasty stuff on the outside of it is going down the drain. In fact, the only thing rinsing does is spread potentially harmful microbes around. In addition to getting bacteria on you hands and clothes, rinsing can contaminate countertops, sink handles, and even the surrounding air.

There are three main ways to lower your chances of contracting Salmonella when dealing with raw turkey: Thaw your bird in the fridge, minimize contact with it before it goes into the oven, and give it plenty of time to cook once it's in there. For the second part, that means setting aside time to pat your turkey dry, remove the excess fat and skin, and season it without handling anything else. To reduce the risk of cross-contamination, wash your hands frequently and wash the plates, knives, and other tools that touched the turkey before using them again. You should also cook your stuffing outside the turkey rather than shoving it inside the cavity and creating a Salmonella bomb.

Once the safety aspect is taken care of, you can focus on making your turkey taste as delicious as possible. Here are some tips from professional chefs on making your starring dish shine this Thanksgiving.

[h/t AOL]

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