10 Unusual Easter Candies You Can Buy Online in Time for the Holiday

iStock.com/bhofack2
iStock.com/bhofack2

You may have heard the news that Cadbury Creme Eggs, pastel-colored candy corn, and marshmallow Peeps are the most-hated Easter candies, according to the results of a recent survey. But what about zombie chocolate bunnies, sparkly "Bunny Corn," and Pancakes and Syrup Peeps? If you’re hoping to fill a basket with some alternative candies this Easter—if for no other purpose than to prank your kids or significant other—then this is the list for you. Here are 10 weird and wonderful sweets that are for sale online right now (some of them in bulk!), from macabre chocolates to oddly flavored jelly beans.

1. Bunny’s Berries

FancyPants FunTime, Amazon

Mmm … bunny droppings. The Bunny's Berries package claims that there’s “a little bit of poop in every bite”—but at least they taste like tropical fruit. The speckled candies come from the same company that makes “Santa’s Surprise” and “Unicorn Poop,” all of which make great gag gifts for friends, family, or coworkers with a sense of humor.

Buy them on Amazon for $8.

2. Unicorn Barf

Unicornucopia, Amazon

While we’re still discussing the bodily functions of adorable animals, let us offer another treat that kids will love: Unicorn Barf. This magical tub of cotton candy lets you “retaste the rainbow.” More specifically, the colors correspond with six flavors: cherry, peach, pineapple, lime, blueberry, and grape.

Buy it on Amazon for $10.

3. Sparkling Bunny Corn

Jelly Belly, Amazon

Candy corn in all its forms tends to generate strong reactions. But even if you hate the sugary nuggets, you have to admit that these sparkly “Bunny Corn” candies would look pretty sitting in a decorative dish on your table.

Buy it from Jelly Belly for $7 on Amazon for $9 per 7.5-ounce bag.

4. Pancakes and Syrup Peeps

Peeps & Company, Amazon

If you love all things marshmallow, you might want to try some of the stranger Peeps varieties on offer, like the limited-edition pancakes and syrup flavor. One reviewer recommends freezing them, while another swears that they taste like the “creme brûlée of marshmallows” when roasted over an open fire. If you’re really feeling bold, you can get them in a variety pack that also comes with Peeps that taste like cotton candy, party cake, and root beer floats.

Buy them on Amazon for $5 for 20 chicks or from the Peeps online store for $2 per 10-pack.

5. Chocolate Zombie Bunnies

J&J Chocolates, Etsy

Blood-covered zombie bunnies might seem too gruesome for an Easter basket, but then again, there is a popular children’s book about a vampire rabbit (remember Bunnicula?). These hand-painted confections from J&J Chocolates come in your choice of milk, white, or dark chocolate.

Buy it on Etsy for $7.

6. Cadbury Screme Eggs

Cadbury, Amazon

These are more of a Halloween novelty, but if you’re feeling a little ornery, you can hand them out at Easter, too. If someone bites into the egg without reading the label, they might be shocked to discover that the fondant in the center is green, not white and yellow.

Buy them on Amazon for $20 for a pack of 42.

7. Purple Rain Tiny Jelly Bird Eggs

Brach's, Amazon

Finally: An Easter candy created specifically for Prince fans who also happen to like berry-flavored jelly beans. It’s a niche product, but we’re still happy it exists. These beans come in four flavors: mixed berry, blueberry, blue raspberry, and grape.

Buy them on Amazon for $28 for three bags.

8. Sour Patch Bunnies

Sour Patch, Walmart

Sour Patch Kids were already a pretty popular candy, but you can now enjoy an Easter-themed version of these tart treats. Bunnies have replaced the original candy shape for a limited time. More bizarrely, Sour Patch Kids Marshmallows have been spotted at some Walmart stores this year, but they don’t appear to be available online at the moment.

Buy the Sour Patch Bunnies from Walmart for $1 per 3.1-ounce box or on Amazon for $11 for 12 boxes.

9. Ice Cream-Flavored Starburst Jellybeans

Starburst, Target

If you love Starbursts and ice cream, you’ll probably love these jelly beans. They come in strawberry, orange sherbet, red raspberry, and lemon sorbet flavors. Despite the creamy taste, they maintain the candy's classic chewy texture, according to Target.

Buy them from Target for $3 per bag or on Amazon for $6.

10. Bunny-Shaped Reese's Puffs Cereal

Reese's, Walmart

OK, so this one is a bit of an outlier, but it’s certainly sweet enough to pass for candy. General Mills has replaced the cereal’s eponymous puffs with chocolatey and peanut buttery bunnies just in time for the holiday. Could there be a more suitable breakfast for Easter morning?

Buy it from Walmart for $4.

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Friday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Digital Projectors, Ugly Christmas Sweaters, and Speakers

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 4. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

What Are Sugar Plums?

Marten Bjork, Unsplash
Marten Bjork, Unsplash

Thanks to The Nutcracker and "'Twas the Night Before Christmas," sugar plums are a symbol of the holidays. But what are sugar plums, exactly? Like figgy pudding and yuletide, the phrase has become something people say (or sing) at Christmastime without knowing the original meaning. Before it was the subject of fairy dances and storybook dreams, a sugar plum was either a fruitless candy or a not-so-sweet euphemism.

According to The Atlantic, the sugar plums English-speakers ate from the 17th to the 19th century contained mostly sugar and no plums. They were made by pouring liquid sugar over a seed (usually a cardamom or caraway seed) or almond, allowing it to harden, and repeating the process. This candy-making technique was called panning, and it created layers of hard sugar shells. The final product was roughly the size and shape of a plum, which is how it came to be associated with the real fruit.

Before the days of candy factories, these confections could take several days to make. Their labor-intensive production made them a luxury good reserved for special occasions. This may explain how sugar plums got linked to the holidays, and why they were special enough to dance through children's heads on Christmas Eve.

The indulgent treat also became a synonym for anything desirable. This second meaning had taken on darker connotations by the 17th century. A 1608 definition from the Oxford English Dictionary describes a sugar plum as “something very pleasing or agreeable, esp. when given as a sop or bribe.” Having a "mouthful of sugar plums" wasn't necessarily a good thing, either. It meant you said sweet words that may have been insincere.

As true sugar plums have fallen out of fashion, demand for Christmas candy resembling the actual fruit has risen. You can now buy fancy candied plums and plum-flavored gummy candies for the holidays, but if you want something closer to the classic sugar plum, a Jordan almond is the more authentic choice.