Illinois Becomes the First State to Require Insurance Companies to Cover EpiPens for Kids

Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The ever-changing landscape of the U.S. healthcare system has created difficulties for people who may no longer be able to afford potentially lifesaving medications like EpiPens. The Illinois government decided it was time to step in: Beginning on January 1, 2020, health insurance companies will be required to cover EpiPen costs for children in the state with severe allergic reactions. Tonya Winders, president and CEO of the Allergy & Asthma Network, told CNN that Illinois is the first state to pass such legislation.

CNN reports that Governor J.B. Pritzker officially signed the law, House Bill 3435, which mandates insurance coverage “for epinephrine injectors for persons 18 years of age or under.” Pritzker also tweeted that “this legislation takes a big step forward in protecting our children and families.” Illinois Senator Julie Morrison, who sponsored the initial proposal, echoed the governor’s sentiment in her own statement.

“We should be doing everything we can to expand access to affordable lifesaving drugs and medicines,” Morrison said. “No child with a serious allergy should be without an epinephrine injector because they cannot afford one.”

In 2009, the purchase of two EpiPens would have set you back about $100; by 2016, that number had skyrocketed to $600. During that time, the situation became so dire that some people were opting to fill their own syringes with epinephrine instead, making it more difficult to measure the dose and also administer the injection. Thankfully, the FDA approved a generic version of the EpiPen last year, providing market competition for pharmaceutical company Mylan, which has been manufacturing EpiPens thus far.

EpiPens work by injecting a high dose of epinephrine, or adrenaline, into your bloodstream, which reduces the rapid swelling of your airways during anaphylactic shock. Since allergic reactions can happen so quickly, your life could be seriously threatened if you don’t have an EpiPen nearby at the time of the attack. Wondering what anaphylactic shock looks like from the inside? Find out here.

[h/t CNN]

Human Body Temperatures Are Dropping, and Science Might Know Why

dcdp/iStock via Getty Images
dcdp/iStock via Getty Images

In 1868, German physician Carl Reinhold August Wunderlich started to popularize what’s become the most recognizable number in all of medicine: 98.6°F or 37°C, which is thought to be the normal average human body temperature. Though his methods later came under scrutiny—Wunderlich stuck an enormous thermometer under the armpits of patients for 20 minutes, a less-than-accurate technique—this baseline has helped physicians identify fevers as well as abnormally low body temperatures, along with corresponding illnesses or diseases.

More than 150 years later, 98.6° may no longer be the standard. Humans seem to be getting cooler. Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine, in a paper published in the journal eLife, compared three large datasets from different time periods: American Civil War records, a national health survey from the 1970s, and a Stanford database from 2007-2017. By comparing recorded body temperatures, the researchers founds that men are now averaging a temperature .58°C less than what's long been considered normal, while women are .32°C lower. On average, each has decreased roughly .03°C every decade since the 1860s.

What drove us to chill out? Scientists have a few theories. A number of advances in human comfort have been ushered in since the 1800s, including better hygiene and readily available food, which may have slowed our metabolic rate (temperature is an indication of that rate). Chronic inflammation, which also raises body temperature, has decreased with the advent of vaccines, antibiotics, and better healthcare. The researchers propose that, on average, our bodies are healthier and slightly less warm.

After all, the average life expectancy in Wunderlich’s era was just 38 years.

[h/t The Independent]

The Reason Doctors Have Such Sloppy Handwriting

Rostislav_Sedlacek/iStock via Getty Images
Rostislav_Sedlacek/iStock via Getty Images

It seems counterintuitive that doctors—widely regarded as some of the smartest, most detail-oriented people out there—so often have horrible handwriting. From a patient’s standpoint, it could seem downright terrifying. If your pharmacist misinterprets your trusted physician’s chicken scratch, you could wind up with a dangerously high dosage of medicine, or even the wrong medicine altogether.

In 2006, the National Academies of Science's Institute of Medicine estimated that doctors’ sloppy handwriting was killing more than 7000 people per year, and preventable medication errors were harming around 1.5 million Americans annually. Many medical offices have since switched to electronic medical records and prescriptions, and some states have even required them to do so.

But that doesn’t tell us why doctors’ penmanship is so poor in the first place. One reason is because doctors have to write much more than we realize.

“In the medical field, if it’s not documented, it didn’t happen,” Celine Thum, medical director at ParaDocs Worldwide, told The Healthy.

If you’re the very first patient of the day, the record of your visit and any prescription slips you get might be perfectly legible. Ten hours and dozens of appointments later, however, your doctor’s hand muscles are probably pretty cramped.

The content they’re writing isn’t particularly easy to spell, either. If a doctor is jotting down glomerulonephritis, for example, they may not stop to make sure all those vowels are in the right places.

“We have so many technical terms that are impossible to write,” Thum said. “You sometimes scribble to cover the error.”

However, if a prescription looks indecipherable to you, it’s possible that your doctor is using shorthand that your pharmacist will immediately understand—like the abbreviation QD, from the Latin phrase for “one a day.”

If you’re confused about what the doctor has written on your prescription slip, you can always ask them to clarify aloud, and double-check that it matches what’s printed on your prescription bottle.

[h/t MSN]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER