Explore a Visual History of the Internet in This New Book From TASCHEN

Taschen
Taschen

Whether you’re looking for a funny cat video or tips on how to run your own business, chances are you’ll find what you need online. But how did the internet develop into this seemingly never-ending source of information? With so much out there, trying to nail down how the web came to be might seem like an impossible task. But Web Design: The Evolution of the Digital World 1990–Today, a book recently published by TASCHEN, will take you through the journey, complete with year-by-year breakdowns of key developments and visuals from the web's earliest days. It's available on TASCHEN's website now for $50 or you can pre-order from Amazon, with a release date set for December 7.

The 21 chapters of this book explore everything from the first viral website to how artificial intelligence came to live online. Web Design also allows readers to have a glimpse inside the minds of some of the people who paved the way for other online pioneers, such as Jonathan Gay, creator of Flash.

The Cover of the book Web Design. The Evolution of the Digital World 1990–Today exploring the internet's history.
TASCHEN

It's in the visual evolution where Web Design really stands out. Readers can see the first photo ever uploaded online, which was of a comedy band called Les Horribles Cernettes, a group composed of CERN employees. There are also photos of more recent accomplishments, like the Mind Scalextric, where users wore headsets and controlled a racecar with their thoughts. And, of course, there are photos that will simply make you feel just a bit nostalgic—think the famously indestructible Nokia phone.

CERN computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee was the first to propose the idea for a database of hypertext links that allowed people to send data and communicate across a network just over 30 years ago. For Berners-Lee, the creation was meant as a more convenient way to find information at work; little did he know what it would evolve into. You can learn more about the internet—like the fact that you can still visit the first-ever website—by heading here.

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Charlotte Brontë's Final "Little Book" Returning to Haworth After $665,000 Auction Bid

Brontë Parsonage Museum, Crowdfunder
Brontë Parsonage Museum, Crowdfunder

Soon after his father gave him 12 toy soldiers as a gift, Branwell Brontë and the three Brontë sisters—Charlotte, Emily, and Anne—established an imaginary, miniature land called the Glass Town Federation where the soldiers could reign. To supplement their game, 14-year-old Charlotte Brontë wrote a series of six books beginning in 1830 called “The Young Men’s Magazine,” which she made tiny enough for the soldiers to “read.”

Four of the books are kept at the family’s former home, now the Brontë Parsonage Museum, in Haworth, Yorkshire. A fifth volume has been lost since the 1930s. Now, after a lengthy fundraising endeavor, the Brontë Society has purchased the last remaining volume at a Paris auction. It’ll soon be displayed alongside the other issues in the museum.

It isn’t the first time the Brontë Society tried to bring the book back home. According to The New York Times, it surfaced at an auction in Sotheby’s in 2011, but the society was outbid by the Paris-based Museum of Letters and Manuscripts, which later folded after being accused of fraud.

The Guardian reports that upon hearing the item would soon be up for auction again, the Brontë Society launched a month-long public campaign to raise money for its purchase, with the public support of Dame Judi Dench, honorary president of the Brontë Society. They crowdfunded about $110,000, and the National Heritage Memorial Fund along with other organizations will cover the rest of the $777,000 cost (bid and fees included).

The 4000-word book measures about 1.5 inches by 2.5 inches and contains all the trappings of a quality literature magazine—ads, stories, and writerly wit. One ad, for example, was placed by “six young men” who “wish to let themselves all a hire for the purpose in cleaning out pockets they are in reduced CIRCUMSTANCES.” And one of the three original stories includes a scene similar to the one in Jane Eyre when Bertha sets Mr. Rochester’s bed on fire.

“Charlotte wrote this minuscule magazine for the toy soldiers she and her siblings played with, and as we walk through the same rooms they did, it seems immensely fitting that it is coming home,” Brontë Parsonage Museum principle curator Ann Dinsdale said in a statement.

[h/t The Guardian]

Can You Guess the Book by the Subtitle?

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