Turducken Pringles Are Real—But Good Luck Finding Them!

Pringles
Pringles

The monumental feat of not-so-modern engineering known as the turducken is just as mouthwatering as it is terrifying. But what if you could get all that sodium-saturated deliciousness without a laborious cooking process—and with a satisfying crunch to boot?

That’s the philosophy behind turducken Pringles, which you achieve by stacking turkey-, duck-, and chicken-flavored Pringles together and gobbling them up in one fell swoop. They’re part of Pringles’s Friendsgiving Feast kit, which also includes other classic Thanksgiving flavors like cranberry sauce, stuffing, and pumpkin pie.

If you’re wondering who would deign to offend the gravy gods by purchasing such a kit, the answer, apparently, is just about everybody. According to Newsweek, there was such a plentiful bounty of online orders when the $16 kit launched yesterday that it sold out immediately, and also crashed the site.

“We underestimated your hunger for our Friendsgiving Feast!” the company wrote in an Instagram post. “Our website is experiencing heavy traffic and we’re doing everything we can to get it back up and running.”


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The comments on the post reveal just how tantalizingly close some prospective customers got to tasting the holy trinity of fowl-flavored chips—the site allowed some people to place the kit in their carts, but shut down as soon as they tried to complete the purchase.

Since then, several new eBay listings for the Friendsgiving kit have appeared, with offers starting around $100.

If you’re not willing to shell out the big ducks for the full feast, you can settle for a sleeve of Pringles’s roasted turkey chips, which are hitting shelves now for a limited time.


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[h/t Newsweek]

Here's Which Thanksgiving Foods You Can Carry on a Plane (And Which You Have to Check)

2GreenEyes/iStock via Getty Images
2GreenEyes/iStock via Getty Images

Boarding an airplane with food can be tricky business—especially during the holiday season. Wondering which Thanksgiving dishes pass muster with airport officials? Here’s a rundown of feast items that can be packed inside your carry-on or checked bags. (To see the full list of permitted edible goods, visit the Transportation Security Administration's website.)

  1. Pumpkin Pie

You can check pies in your luggage, or take them on the plane as a carry-on. If you do check a pie or other dessert, Condé Nast Traveler recommends wrapping it in plastic, placing it inside a sturdy cardboard box, and swaddling the box in a blanket or bubble wrap. If you’re toting it by hand, make sure the packaging is sturdy enough to survive security checkpoints, overhead bins, and additional TSA screenings.

  1. Cranberry Sauce and Gravy

The TSA’s typical rule for liquids also applies to Thanksgiving sauces and spreads. You’ll have to check cranberry sauce, gravy, jams, and jellies if they’re stored inside a receptacle that’s larger than 3.4 ounces. You can bring them on the plane in your carry-on if they’re transported in a 3.4-ounce container and placed inside a sealed, clear, quart-sized zip-top bag (just like your shampoo).

  1. Turkeys and Turduckens

Turkeys, turduckens, and other poultry, whether fresh or frozen, are OK for both carry-on and checked bags, so long as they are packed in a maximum of five pounds dry ice and the cooler or shipping box doesn't exceed your airline's carry-on size allowance. If the meat is packed in regular ice, it must be completely frozen as it goes through security.

  1. Wine

As with other liquors, check all wine bottles exceeding 3.4 ounces. According to Vine Pair, you can prevent potential disasters by storing bottles in a hard suitcase, lining the interior with soft clothing, and wrapping the bottles in even more clothing before tucking them inside the suitcase's middle. You can also make things easier by buying a special valise designed to transport wine.

Unsure about additional food items? Ask the TSA by tweeting a picture to @AskTSA, contacting the agency via Facebook Messenger, or visiting TSA.gov and using the “What can I bring?” search function.

61 Festive Facts About Thanksgiving

jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images
jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images

From the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to back-to-back NFL games, there are certain Thanksgiving traditions that you’re probably familiar with, even if your own celebration doesn’t necessarily include them. But how much do you really know about the high-calorie holiday?

To give you a crash course on the history of Thanksgiving and everything we associate with it, WalletHub compiled stats from the U.S. Census Bureau, the American Farm Bureau Association, Harris Poll, and more into one illuminating infographic. Featured facts include the date Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday (October 3, 1863) and the percentage of Americans whose favorite dish is turkey (39 percent).

Not only is it interesting to learn how the majority of Americans celebrate the holiday, it also might make you feel better about how your own Thanksgiving usually unfolds. If you’re frantically calling the Butterball Turkey hotline for help on how to cook a giant bird, you’re not alone—the hotline answers more than 100,000 questions in November and December. And you’re in good company if your family forgoes the home-cooked meal altogether, too: 9 percent of Americans head to a restaurant for Thanksgiving dinner.

It’s also a great way to fill in the blanks of your Thanksgiving knowledge. You might know that the president ceremoniously pardons one lucky turkey every year, but do you know which president kicked off the peculiar practice? It was George H.W. Bush, in 1989.

Read on to discover the details of America’s most delicious holiday below, and find out why we eat certain foods on Thanksgiving here.

Thanksgiving-2019-By-The-Numbers

Source: WalletHub

[h/t WalletHub]

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