Put Shakespeare's Best Insults On a Poster, Coffee Mug, or Even Some Bandages

Take your insult inspiration from the master: William Shakespeare.
Take your insult inspiration from the master: William Shakespeare.
Curious Charts Commission/Three Rivers Press/Amazon

If you’ve ever struggled to find the words to describe how angry or frustrated someone is making you, perhaps William Shakespeare, iconic writer and master of insults, can help.

Adorned with 100 insults from the Bard's many works, this poster from Curious Charts Commission (Amazon, $25) is the perfect reference piece to hang in your home or office for when you're struggling to think of the perfect takedown for anyone who crosses you. To help you get started, the 18-inch-by-24-inch poster is broken up into sections that include food and drink; types of individuals; inanimate objects; bodily qualities; creatures; and—of course—personal attributes and traits. Once you’ve decided the optimal route to take, you have a wide array of put-downs to choose from, ranging from “Were I like thee, I’d throw away myself,” to slightly simpler ones like, “You egg!”

The only drawback to the poster is that you can't take it everywhere with you. But the 14-ounce Shakespeare insults mug ($16), on the other hand, is the perfect choice for snark on the go. So next time a chatty co-worker tries to tell you about their weekend before you've even had your Monday morning coffee, you can simply look up and call them the "anointed sovereign of sighs and groans."

A mug decorated with Shakespeare insults.
Shakespeare insult mug from Unemployed Philosopher's Guild.
Unemployed Philosopher's Guild/Amazon

If, after all that, you’re still struggling to find the words, Shakespeare’s Insults: Educating Your Wit ($12), a book of 5000 slights pulled from 38 of Shakespeare’s plays, can be of assistance. Or, you can help heal a physical wound by dishing out an emotional one with these Shakespearean insult bandages ($6). You get 15 in a pack, and each box comes with a prize inside. 

Shakespeare Insult Bandages.
Shakespeare insult bandages found on Amazon.
Accoutrements/Amazon

Beyond a repertoire of insults, Shakespeare also coined many words we still use today. Check out the full list here.

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Make Your Own Ship in a Bottle With This LEGO Set

This particular design was based off an idea from a long-time LEGO fan.
This particular design was based off an idea from a long-time LEGO fan.
LEGO/Amazon

Building a ship in a bottle doesn’t need to be a stodgy affair—especially when you’re doing it with LEGO bricks.

The 962-piece set ($70 on Amazon) is based on a design from Jake Sadovich, a longtime LEGO fan from Idaho. Sadovich spent three weeks designing his own version of a ship in a bottle using 1400 LEGO bricks before uploading images of the finished result to the LEGO Ideas site in November 2016. His project received the 10,000 supporters it needed to garner a review from the LEGO team in less than two months, and in August 2017, the company green-lit plans to build and sell an official set based on his design.

A LEGO ship in the bottle with the box.
Despite the ship's small size it has a lot of features.
LEGO/Amazon

Placed inside a bottle made of transparent bricks, the miniature ship boasts plenty of detailed features for its 5-inch-long size, including sails, six cannons, a crow’s nest, a compass (sorry, it isn’t a working one), and a flag. There's even a wax-sealed cork built out of LEGO bricks, too, as well as small LEGO pieces designed to serve as the water beneath the ship.

Some of the other fan-submitted LEGO Ideas projects the company has brought to life include the NASA Apollo Saturn V ($200) and a replica of the Central Perk set from Friends ($60).

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

Sling TV’s 14-Day Free Trial Gives You Access to Countless Movies and Shows, No Credit Card Required

Sling's 14-day free trial doesn't require a credit card, so you won't accidentally be charged once it's up.
Sling's 14-day free trial doesn't require a credit card, so you won't accidentally be charged once it's up.
Prostock-Studio/iStock via Getty Images Plus

You’ve probably encountered more than one so-called free trial that required you to input a credit card to access it. And if you’re like many of us, you have probably forgotten to cancel the trial before the free period ended—more than once. But Sling TV is looking to offer users a free trial that’s, well, actually free. From now until April 5, new subscribers can access over 50,000 on-demand movies, 45 channels, and more during their free 14-day trial, no credit card required.

Fittingly dubbed the “Quarantine Special,” the free trial gives viewers access to a Sling Blue subscription, which offers channels like CNN, MSNBC, Bravo, A&E, Cartoon Network, Nick Jr., and more. The Blue subscription also allows you to stream on up to three devices simultaneously and record live shows on their cloud DVR.

Rather than having to sign up for a long-term contract like with traditional cable, Sling is a month-to-month service that allows you to stream content to your TV or computer/smartphone through web browsers, Roku, Amazon, iOS, and Android devices.

After the free trial, you have the option of signing up for the Sling Blue or Orange subscription, both of which are $20 for the first month and then $30 after that. There are a few key differences between the two. According to Tom’s Guide, with Orange, you won’t have access to NBC networks. And with Blue, you won’t be able to watch ESPN or the Disney Channel. Orange only lets you stream on one device at a time, whereas with Blue, you can stream on up to three simultaneously. However, you can swap between the two for no extra cost, or you could combine the subscriptions for $45 a month.

Much like Sling, Disney Plus also allows subscribers to enjoy seven days (with a credit card) for no cost, and you can get more details by heading here. And if you're looking for more ways to save money as a cord-cutter, check out our guide on the cheapest ways to do so.

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

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