Your birth month might affect more than just your daily horoscope. A new study from scientists at the Columbia University Medical Center looked into whether there’s any relationship between birth month and disease risk. By developing an algorithm to examine medical histories of 1.7 million New York City-based patients from 1985 to 2013, the scientists were able to compare 1688 diseases against birthdates and check the accuracy of previous smaller studies. The researchers found that 55 diseases—39 of which were from older medical literature—had some connections to birth months.

Among their results are nine types of heart disease that may relate to being born in March, a connection between asthma risk and July and October babies, and a prevalence of ADHD in individuals born in November. In general, May babies had the lowest disease risk, while October babies had the highest.

"It's important not to get overly nervous about these results because even though we found significant associations, the overall disease risk is not that great,” says Dr. Nicholas P. Tatonetti, the senior author of the study. "The risk related to birth month is relatively minor when compared to more influential variables like diet and exercise."

Regardless, the discoveries may be useful for better understanding and eliminating disease risks.

[h/t Science Daily