This Crazy Deep-Sea Fish Has a Completely Transparent Head

The barreleye fish looks like a model in a high school science classroom with a see-through portion to allow for an examination of the inner workings. But this is how the astonishingly bizarre fish naturally occurs—transparent head and all.

Though it was first discovered in 1939, little was known about Macropinna microstoma for the next 70 years. The only information about the fish, which lives 2000 to 2600 feet below the surface, came from damaged specimens caught in fishing nets, meaning scientists never saw an intact barreleye fish until recently. Depictions from the 20th century show the large, tubular eyes necessary to make use of limited sunlight, but they failed to show the fluid-filled dome that covers those unusual peepers.

In 2009, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) was finally able to film the barreleye fish in its natural habitat using a remotely operated camera and captured a short-lived specimen for research purposes. This first-ever footage of the curious creature, seen below, revealed the transparent dome that covers and protects its eyes.

The two dark spots that look like eyes are actually part of the barreleye fish's olfactory system, and are akin to nostrils. Meanwhile, its eyes are the bright green orbs inside its head. In the video, they're pointing upward, scanning the water above for potential prey. Scientists had long wondered how the fish would actually feed if it is always looking perpendicular to where its mouth is, but MBARI researchers determined that the eyes can swivel within the clear dome to face forward if need be. The scientists speculate the barreleye fish hunts by stealing captured prey from massive jellies like siphonophores. The transparent head acts as a shield to protect the fish's eyes from the jelly's stinging tentacles as it snatches a snack with its small, precise mouth

This Course Will Teach You How to Play Guitar Like a Pro for $29

BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images
BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images

Be honest: You’ve watched a YouTube video or two in an attempt to learn how to play a song on the guitar. Whether it was through tabs or simply copying whatever you saw on the screen, the fun always ends when friends start throwing out requests for songs you have no idea how to play. So how about you actually learn how to play guitar for real this time?

It’s now possible to learn guitar from home with the Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle, which is currently on sale for $29. Grab that Gibson, Fender, or whatever you have handy, and learn to strum rhythms from scratch.

The strumming course will teach you how to count beats and rests to turn your hands and fingers into the perfect accompaniment for your own voice or other musicians. Then, you can take things a step further and learn advanced jamming and soloing to riff anytime, anywhere. This course will teach you to improvise across various chords and progressions so you can jump into any jam with something original. You’ll also have the chance to dive deep into the major guitar genres of bluegrass, blues, and jazz. Lessons in jam etiquette, genre history, and how to read music will separate you from a novice player.

This bundle also includes courses in ear training so you can properly identify any relative note, interval, or pitch. That way, you can play along with any song when it comes on, or even understand how to modify it into the key you’d prefer. And when the time comes to perform, be prepared with skilled hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides, bends, trills, vibrato, and fret-tapping. Not only will you learn the basic foundations of guitar, you’ll ultimately be able to develop your own style with the help of these lessons.

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A Prehistoric Great White Shark Nursery Has Been Discovered in Chile

Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
solarseven/iStock via Getty Images

Great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) may be one of the most formidable and frightening apex predators on the planet today, but life for them isn’t as easy as horror movies would suggest. Due to a slow growth rate and the fact that they produce few offspring, the species is listed as vulnerable to extinction.

There is a way these sharks ensure survival, and that is by creating nurseries—a designated place where great white shark babies (called pups) are protected from other predators. Now, researchers at the University of Vienna and colleagues have discovered these nurseries occurred in prehistoric times.

In a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, Jamie A. Villafaña from the university’s Institute of Palaeontology describes a fossilized nursery found in Coquimbo, Chile. Researchers were examining a collection of fossilized great white shark teeth between 5 and 2 million years old along the Pacific coast of Chile and Peru when they noticed a disproportionate number of young shark teeth in Coquimbo. There was also a total lack of sexually mature animals' teeth, which suggests the site was used primarily by pups and juveniles as a nursery.

Though modern great whites are known to guard their young in designated areas, the researchers say this is the first example of a paleo-nursery. Because the climate was much warmer when the paleo-nursery was in use, the researchers think these protective environments can deepen our understanding of how great white sharks can survive global warming trends.