Andrew Garn loves pigeons. The New York City photographer turned his lens on the ubiquitous birds eight years ago, and he hasn’t turned back.

Humans and pigeons have a long and storied history. We’ve used pigeons in communication and in entertainment. We even tried to use them in war. Today, most city-dwellers think of pigeons as “rats with wings."

Not Garn. “I see them as jewels,” he told Audubon  magazine. And in his lovingly composed photographs, that’s exactly what the pigeons look like. Their feathers iridesce like oil slicks. Their bright eyes reveal a keen curiosity about the world around them. Each bird is unique, and each is beautiful. 


Garn finds his subjects going about their avian business in the city, in private homes, and in wildlife rehabilitation centers like the Wild Bird Fund

A selection of Garn’s pigeon portraits is currently on display at Brooklyn Bridge Park. His book The New York Pigeon will be published in spring 2016.

All photos courtesy of Andrew Garn. Fifty percent of proceeds from the sale of pigeon portrait prints will be donated to the Wild Bird Fund.

[h/t Audubon.org]