In Terrell Place, a building in Washington, D.C., a routine walk becomes an interactive experience where the walls react to you. The main hallway of the structure is home to a large-scale installation incorporated into the architecture that features media displays that react to nearby movement, Designboom reports.

Here's how it works: Infrared cameras in the main lobby and hallways detect when someone is approaching and cause the artwork on LED panels to change its pattern of movement; cherry blossom trees sway as if they were hit with a soft breeze, and spiraling light beams become concentrated and follow the person like metal shavings to a magnet.

The LED panels—created by ESI Design, a firm that specializes in experience design—cover 1700 square feet, with the largest of the media panels stretching 80 feet wide and 13 feet high, according to the designers. There are three modes with corresponding artwork: Seasons, Color play, and Cityscape, each programmed with different sequences.

Check out the video above, where you can see two of the three modes (it does not include Cityscape) at work.

[h/t Designboom]

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