The mental_floss Guide to the Ryder Cup

Getty Images
Getty Images

Golf's Ryder Cup takes over Louisville's Valhalla Golf Club this weekend as Europe and the United States vie for world supremacy in the sport. The biennial event is a big date on golf's calendar, but what are the origins and history of this heated tradition? Let's try to answer a few questions.

1. How long has the Ryder Cup been around?

The idea of pitting the top American golf pros against their British counterparts was the brainchild of Sylvanus P. Jermain, the president of Toledo's Inverness Club. Jermain first presented the idea in 1921, and the two countries played an unofficial exhibition match that year. The British creamed the Americans 9-3. A 1926 rematch was even more disastrous for the Americans, who lost this tilt 13.5 to 1.5. The event became an actual competition in 1927 in Worcester, Massachusetts.

2. Why is it called the Ryder Cup?

The 1926 exhibition contest drew a healthy crowd, but no one was quite as interested as Samuel Ryder, an Englishman who had become quite wealthy selling packets of seeds. Ryder was an enthusiastic amateur golfer and a devoted student of British star Abe Mitchell. After the exhibition ended, Mitchell and his fellow golfers talked Ryder into donating a trophy to get the two countries to compete on a regular basis. Ryder also offered five pounds apiece to the members of the winning team, a post-match party, and picked up a shortfall in the British travel budget for the first Ryder Cup in 1927.

3. What's the trophy like?

Ryder commissioned a large gold chalice for the winning country and shelled out 250 pounds for its design and creation. The 17-inch trophy reaches its peak with a tiny golfer modeled after Ryder's favorite British star and tutor, Abe Mitchell.

4. Wait, British and American golfers? Aren't there Europeans in this year's Ryder Cup?

Yes, there are. Although the British pummeled the U.S. team in those two early exhibitions, the tables turned once the official Ryder Cup began. Americans won the inaugural event in 1927, and although the British team won in 1929 and 1933, they only picked up one more victory in the next 50 years. During the 1977 Cup, American legend Jack Nicklaus pointed out that the Cup's popularity would probably wane if something didn't level the playing field. After some debate and the approval of Samuel Ryder's family, organizers decided to transform the British team into a European squad for the 1979 Ryder Cup. Although the American team won the first three Cups against the European team, the Euros have taken eight of the last 11 meetings, including a three-Cup winning streak coming into this year's competition.

5. What's the format of the Ryder Cup?

Every part of the Ryder Cup tournament is played according to match play rules, which means that the two teams compete to win each hole and whichever side wins more holes over the course of the round wins the game. Each game won earns the player or team's side a point. Ties are "halved," which means each team gets half a point.

Various rounds throughout the weekend have different structures, though. This year four groups of two-man teams will pair off in fourball play on Friday and Saturday. In fourball matches, two golfers from each team play each hole on their own, and the team whose player has the lowest score on the hole wins the hole. On Friday and Saturday four more groups of two-man teams will face off in foursomes play in which each team just plays a single ball and teammates alternate shots. Whichever team holes the ball in the fewest strokes wins the hole. Finally, on Sunday each team sends out 12 golfers for one-on-one singles match play against a member of the opposite team. Lowest score on each hole wins it. Whichever team wins the most points over the course of the 28-game weekend wins the Ryder Cup.

6. What happens if the two teams tie?

In the event of a tie, the Cup stays with the defending champs, so if the U.S. wants the hardware, it needs to win outright. This rule came into play in 1969 and again in 1989.

7. What do the team captains do?

This year's captains, Nick Faldo for the Euros and Paul Azinger for the Americans (above), won't be playing, but they'll play a crucial role in their team's chances. PGA Tour earnings or World and European Points ranking determine most spots on the teams' rosters, but the respective captains get to pick the final four golfers for the American squad and the last two for the Euro team. The captains determine the team pairings for the early rounds, an important task that requires a keen eye for team chemistry. The captain of the home team also gets to determine the format of certain rounds; this year Azinger used this power to change what had been a better-ball format back to the alternate-shot foursomes.

8. Who's the best Ryder Cup golfer ever?

Hard to say, but Nick Faldo deserves to be in the conversation. The English great has appeared in a record 11 Ryder Cups, and has won more points (25) than anyone else in Ryder Cup history. He's the captain of this year's Euro squad, but like we said, he won't be playing. German pro Bernhard Langer isn't too far behind Faldo, though. The winner of the 1983 and 1985 Masters has the second-most points in Ryder Cup history (24) and is tied for second-most appearances with Irish pro Christy O'Connor, Sr.

Ethan Trex co-writes Straight Cash, Homey, the Internet's undisputed top source for pictures of people in Ryan Leaf jerseys.

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The Bud Bowl: A Definitive History

We’re Lovin’ the McSki, Sweden’s Ski-Thru McDonald’s

Per-Olof Forsberg, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Per-Olof Forsberg, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Gliding down the slopes for a few hours can leave you happily exhausted and so ravenous that you wish you could stuff a big, juicy burger in your mouth before you even get back to the lodge. At one Swedish ski resort, you can.

Lindvallen, a ski resort located approximately 200 miles northwest of Stockholm, is home to the McSki, a quaint, wood-paneled McDonald’s that you simply ski right up to. If all the surrounding snow leaves you with a hankering for a McFlurry, have at it; Delish reports that you can order anything from the regular McDonald’s menu. (Having said that, we can’t promise the McFlurry machine will actually be working.)

The ski-thru window is ideal for skiers and snowboarders who don’t want to break for a lengthy lunch, but there’s an option for people who would rather not scarf down a combo meal while standing up: According to the blog Messy Nessy, the indoor seating area can accommodate up to 140 people.

The McSki has been delighting (and nourishing) vacationers since it opened in 1996, and it’s definitely a must-visit for ski lovers and fast food aficionados alike. It’s not, however, the strangest McDonald’s restaurant in the world. New Zealand built one inside an airplane, and there’s also a giant Happy Meal-shaped McDonald’s in Dallas. Explore 10 other downright bizarre McDonald’s locations here.

[h/t Delish]

7 Weird Super Bowl Halftime Acts

Al Bello, Getty Images
Al Bello, Getty Images

Shakira and Jennifer Lopez seem like natural choices to perform the halftime show at this year’s Super Bowl, but the event didn’t always feature musical acts from major pop stars. Michael Jackson kicked off the trend at Super Bowl XXVII in 1993, but prior to that, halftime shows weren’t a platform for the hottest celebrities of the time. They centered around themes instead, and may have featured appearances from Peanuts characters, Jazzercisers, or a magician dressed like Elvis. In honor of Super Bowl LIV on February 2, we’ve rounded up some of the weirdest acts in halftime show history.

1. Return of the Mickey Mouse Club

The era of Super Bowl halftimes before wardrobe malfunctions, illuminati conspiracy theories, and Left Shark was a more innocent time. For 1977’s event, the Walt Disney Company produced a show that doubled as a squeaky-clean promotion of its brand. Themed “Peace, Joy, and Love,” the Super Bowl XI halftime show opened with a 250-piece band rendition of “It’s a Small World (After All).” Disney also used the platform to showcase its recently revamped Mickey Mouse Club.

2. 88 Grand Pianos and 300 Jazzercisers

The theme of the halftime show at Super Bowl XXII in 1988 was “Something Grand.” Naturally, it featured 88 tuxedoed pianists playing 88 grand pianos. Rounding out the program were 400 swing band performers, 300 Jazzercisers, 44 Rockettes, two marching bands, and Chubby Checker telling everyone to “Twist Again."

3. Elvis Impersonator Performs the World’s Largest Card Trick

Many of the music industry's most successful pop stars—like Prince, Madonna, and, uh, Milli Vanilli—were at the height of their fame in 1989, but none of them appeared at Super Bowl XXIII. Instead, the NFL hired an Elvis Presley-impersonating magician to perform. The show, titled “BeBop Bamboozled,” was a tribute to the 1950s, and it featured Elvis Presto performing “the world’s largest card trick.” It also may have included the world's largest eye exam: The show boasted 3D effects, and viewers were urged to pick up special glasses before the game. If the visuals didn't pop like they were supposed to, people were told to see an eye doctor.

4. The Peanuts Salute New Orleans

Super Bowl XXIV featured one of the last halftime acts that was completely devoid of any musical megastars. The biggest celebrity at the 1990 halftime show was Snoopy. Part of the show’s theme was the “40th Anniversary of 'Peanuts,'” and to celebrate the milestone, performers dressed as Peanuts characters and danced on stage. The other half of the theme was “Salute to New Orleans”—not necessarily the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the comic strip.

5. A Tribute to the Winter Olympics

Super Bowl XXVI preceded the 1992 Winter Olympics—a fact that was made very clear by the event’s halftime. The show was titled “Winter Magic” and it paid tribute to the winter games with ice skaters, snowmobiles, and a cameo from the 1980 U.S. hockey team. Other acts, like a group of parachute-pants-wearing children performing the “Frosty the Snowman Rap,” were more generally winter-themed than specific to the Olympics. About 22 million viewers changed the channel during halftime to watch In Living Color’s Super Bowl special, which may have convinced the NFL to hire Michael Jackson the following year.

6. Indiana Jones and the Temple of the Forbidden Eye

“Peace, Joy, and Love” wasn’t the only Disney-helmed Super Bowl halftime. In 1995, Disney produced a halftime show called “Indiana Jones and the Temple of the Forbidden Eye” to tease the new Disneyland ride of the same name. It centered around a skit in which actors playing Indiana Jones and Marion Ravenwood stole the Vince Lombardi Trophy from an exotic temple, and it included choreographed stunts, fiery special effects, and a snake. Patti LaBelle and Tony Bennett were also there.

7. The Blues Brothers, Minus John Belushi

The 1990s marked an odd period for halftime shows as they moved from schlocky themed variety shows to major music events. Super Bowl XXXI in 1997 perfectly encapsulates this transition period. James Brown and ZZ Top performed, but the headliners were the Blues Brothers. John Belushi had been dead for more than a decade by that point, so Jim Belushi took his place beside Dan Aykroyd. John Goodman was also there to promote the upcoming movie Blues Brother 2000. The flashy advertisement didn’t have the impact they had hoped for and the film was a massive flop when it premiered.

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