Is It Bad to Use the Same Plastic Water Bottle Every Day?

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istock.com/avi_gamliel

If you’re not washing it, then yeah, it can get kind of gross. Reusing an unwashed bottle or cup, even if you’re “only” drinking water out of it, puts your mouth in intimate contact with a wonderful bacterial breeding ground.

Bacteria grow really well in moist, warm environments. While almost any similar container will suffice, a narrow-mouthed plastic water bottle is difficult to scrub and especially friendly to bacterial growth. In a 2003 study, Canadian researchers collected samples from children’s water bottles and found that almost two-thirds contained bacterial contamination that exceeded safe drinking water guidelines. While the study couldn’t pinpoint the source of the contamination, the researchers thought that the bacteria most likely simply made the leap from the students’ hands to the bottles and set up shop.

So, you have to vanquish the bacteria between uses, but here’s the snag to washing your bottle: cleaning the things might actually make them unsafe in a different way. Bisphenol A or BPA is a chemical compound used in the making of polycarbonate plastics, including some kinds of plastic bottles. It mimics estrogen and binds to the same receptors in the human body as natural hormones. Over the years, it’s been linked to everything from cancer cell growth and decreased sperm count to developmental and neurological issues.

When you give a bottle a good scrub, you’re wearing down the plastic and allowing BPA and other chemicals to leach from it and into the bottle’s contents. Using the bottles for hot liquids, putting them in the dishwasher, and trying to sterilize them with boiling water all do the same thing. Dr. Scott Belcher, a pharmacolgist at the University of Cincinnati, has done several studies on BPA in bottles and found that heat is a big factor in its release. One study showed that when BPA-containing drinking bottles are exposed to boiling water, the chemical is released 15 to 55 times faster than normal. “These are fantastic products and they work well,” Belcher told Scientific American. “[But] based on my knowledge of the scientific data, there is reason for caution. I have made a decision for myself not to use them."

As for the alternative to polycarbonate plastics, PET, the jury is largely still out on how safe it is. The contents of the bottle and the temperature at which it’s stored and washed both seem to influence the amount of plastic components leaching from it and the rate at which they leach (Update: Just a few of the relevant studies on bottles from both the US and Europe can be found here, here, here and here.) At the very least, solar water disinfection appears safe (depending on where the bottle came from), if a little inconvenient.

So what's a person to do to avoid illness from both creepy crawlies and plastic components? Regularly-washed glass, stainless steel or aluminum water bottles seem to be the way to go. They’re dishwasher-safe and easier to clean, providing less favorable breeding grounds for germs. They’re also chemically safe, according to one of Belcher’s most recent studies.

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

Gaming is a competitive industry, and understanding just programming or just artistry isn’t enough to land a job. The School of Game Design’s lifetime membership is set up to educate you in both fields so your resume and work can stand out.

The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

School of Game Design: Lifetime Membership - $49

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The Right Way to Clean Your Face Mask

Properly cleaning your face mask is important to keep it free of infectious material.
Properly cleaning your face mask is important to keep it free of infectious material.
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In an effort to slow the transmission of coronavirus in public settings, health officials are advising that people unable to practice social distancing wear a cloth face mask. While not as effective at filtering respiratory droplets as medical-grade masks, cloth masks are still recommended as a practical preventative step.

Like all apparel, masks get dirty. They absorb sweat and germs, and they need to be cleaned. But how?

According to National Geographic, the best way to clean a cloth face mask is to take the same approach as the rest of your laundry—toss it in the washer. Laundry detergent is effective against coronavirus because the pathogen is encased in a layer of oily lipids and proteins. Detergents and hand soaps contain surfactants, which reduce the surface tension of the fatty layer. The surfactant molecule is attracted to oil and grease on one end and water on the other. The end that disrupts the oil bursts the coronavirus envelope apart. Tiny pods of surfactant called micelles trap and wash the remnants away. It’s this activity, not the water temperature, that kills the virus, though using a higher dryer temperature can destroy most microorganisms that might be lingering.

Bear in mind there’s a recommended way to take off your mask. Make sure your hands are clean, then pull it off using the straps behind your ears. This avoids contaminating the mask—and your face—with any pathogens that might be on your hands.

Medical-grade masks are trickier, as they’re intended to be used only once and can’t stand up to a wash cycle. If you have an N95 or paper mask, you can set it aside for several days, at which point the virus is likely to become inactive. But keep in mind that health officials still aren’t entirely sure how long coronavirus can persist on surfaces, and it’s possible for a mask to collect particles over time, increasing the viral load.

But what about the rest of your clothes? Experts say not to worry so much about disrobing the minute you get home. The coronavirus likes moisture and dries out quickly on fabrics. You need to be careful with the material covering your face, but the rest of your outfit can wait until your regularly scheduled laundry appointment.

[h/t National Geographic]