11 Incredible Stephen Hawking Quotes

Getty Images
Getty Images

When Stephen Hawking was diagnosed with motor neurone disease at age 21, doctors thought he'd only survive a few more years. But the theoretical physicist defied the odds: Hawking, who passed away yesterday, lived to be 76. Here are 11 quotes from the director of research and founder of the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at Cambridge and author of A Brief History of Time

1. ON HIS SCHOOLING

"At school, I was never more than about halfway up the class. It was a very bright class. My classwork was very untidy, and my handwriting was the despair of my teachers. But my classmates gave me the nickname Einstein, so presumably they saw signs of something better. When I was twelve, one of my friends bet another friend a bag of sweets that I would never come to anything. I don't know if this bet was ever settled, and if so, which way it was decided."

— From the lecture "My Brief History," 2010

2. ON ALIEN LIFE

"If aliens visit us, the outcome would be much as when Columbus landed in America, which didn't turn out well for the Native Americans. We only have to look at ourselves to see how intelligent life might develop into something we wouldn't want to meet."

— From Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking, 2010

3. ON THE EUREKA MOMENT SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY

“I wouldn’t compare it to sex, but it lasts longer.”

— From a lecture at Arizona State University, April 2011

4. ON DISABILITIES

"If you are disabled, it is probably not your fault, but it is no good blaming the world or expecting it to take pity on you. One has to have a positive attitude and must make the best of the situation that one finds oneself in; if one is physically disabled, one cannot afford to be psychologically disabled as well. In my opinion, one should concentrate on activities in which one's physical disability will not present a serious handicap. I am afraid that Olympic Games for the disabled do not appeal to me, but it is easy for me to say that because I never liked athletics anyway. On the other hand, science is a very good area for disabled people because it goes on mainly in the mind. Of course, most kinds of experimental work are probably ruled out for most such people, but theoretical work is almost ideal. My disabilities have not been a significant handicap in my field, which is theoretical physics. Indeed, they have helped me in a way by shielding me from lecturing and administrative work that I would otherwise have been involved in. I have managed, however, only because of the large amount of help I have received from my wife, children, colleagues and students. I find that people in general are very ready to help, but you should encourage them to feel that their efforts to aid you are worthwhile by doing as well as you possibly can."

— From "Handicapped People and Science," Science Digest 92, No. 9, September 1984

5. ON TIME TRAVEL

"I would go back to 1967, and the birth of my first child, Robert. My three children have brought me great joy."

— To The New York Times, May 2011

6. ON FATE VERSUS FREE WILL

"I have noticed that even people who claim everything is predetermined and that we can do nothing to change it, look before they cross the road."

— From Black Holes and Baby Universes and Other Essays

7. ON SCIENCE VERSUS RELIGION

"There is a fundamental difference between religion, which is based on authority, [and] science, which is based on observation and reason. Science will win, because it works."

— To Diane Sawyer/ABC News, June 2010

8. ON IMPERFECTION

"Next time someone complains that you have made a mistake, tell him that may be a good thing. Because without imperfection, neither you nor I would exist."

— From Into the Universe with Stephen Hawking, 2010

9. On HIS I.Q.

"I have no idea. People who boast about their I.Q. are losers."

— To The New York Times, December 2004

10. ON WOMEN

“They are a complete mystery.”

— To New Scientist, January 2012

11. ON THE ADVICE HE GAVE HIS CHILDREN

"One, remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Two, never give up work. Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it. Three, if you are lucky enough to find love, remember it is there and don't throw it away."

— To Diane Sawyer/ABC News, June 2010

10 Trailblazing Facts About Susan B. Anthony

Scewing, Wikimedia Commons // Public domain
Scewing, Wikimedia Commons // Public domain

When people think of the suffrage movement, Susan B. Anthony is one of the names that immediately comes to mind. Although she didn't live long enough to vote (legally, at least), her contributions to women’s rights were part of a chain of events that culminated in the Nineteenth Amendment. On the occasion of her 200th birthday on February 15, 2020, here are a few facts you might not know about Anthony’s life and legacy.

1. Susan B. Anthony was born into a family of abolitionists.

A large house
Susan B. Anthony's childhood home, photographed in 1897.
Internet Archive Book Images, Wikimedia Commons // No known copyright restrictions

Susan Brownell Anthony was born into a Quaker family in Adams, Massachusetts, on February 15, 1820. She was the second of seven children, and her entire family was full of activists. Anti-slavery meetings were eventually held at their farm every Sunday, and her father became friends with prominent abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison. These experiences shaped her views on equality, and some of her earliest activist work was in support of the abolitionist movement.

2. Susan B. Anthony was a teacher for 10 years.

Susan B. Anthony in her younger years
Susan B. Anthony in her younger years
Wikimedia/NYPL Digital Gallery // Public Domain

Teaching was one of the few professions open to women of Anthony's era. She taught from 1839 to 1849, eventually becoming principal of the girls' department at Canajoharie Academy in upstate New York. During her decade as a teacher, she spoke publicly about the need for higher pay for female teachers, as well as more professional opportunities for women.

3. Susan B. Anthony was BFFs with Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in 1870

A mutual acquaintance, Amelia Bloomer, introduced Anthony to Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1851. You could say it was friendship at first sight. Stanton later said of her first impression of Anthony, "I liked her thoroughly, and why I did not at once invite her home with me to dinner, I do not know." More than pals, they were also close collaborators with similar views. Together, they would eventually found the National Woman Suffrage Association and also start up a women's rights newspaper called The Revolution. Although their personal lives were very different, they found a way to use it to their advantage. Anthony, who never married or had children, was free to attend rallies and speaking engagements across the country. Stanton had seven children, so she wrote from home as a means of influencing the movement.

4. Susan B. Anthony's first public speech was about the dangers of alcohol.

Susan B. Anthony
Library of Congress/Wikimedia // No known restrictions

Anthony didn’t attend her first women's rights convention until she was in her thirties. Before that, she was active in the temperance movement, which advocated stronger liquor laws and preached the dangers of heavy drinking. She gave her first public speech at a Daughters of Temperance event, but when she was denied the right to speak at a Sons of Temperance convention a few years later, she and Stanton decided to form their own Women's State Temperance Society. They launched a petition to get the state legislature to limit the sale of liquor, but it was revoked because most of the signers were women and children. Anthony and Stanton realized they’d never be taken seriously until women gained the right to vote, so their priorities started to shift around this time.

5. Susan B. Anthony cut her hair and dressed differently to prove a point.

Amelia Bloomer in the outfit she designed, with
Amelia Bloomer in the outfit she designed, with "bloomers"
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Many activists and suffragists argued that women should be free to wear less restrictive clothes than the corsets and heavy underskirts that dominated in those days. To prove their point, many women wore trouser-like bloomers (named for Amelia Bloomer, who advocated them) under their skirts. Following in the footsteps of Stanton, Anthony cut her long, brown hair and started wearing bloomers, albeit somewhat reluctantly. She was ridiculed for her new look, and ultimately decided that the negative attention detracted from the message she wanted to convey. She reverted to her old ways after a year.

6. Susan B. Anthony believed that riding bicycles was one of the best ways to fight the patriarchy.

Women cyclists
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Bicycles were kind of a big deal for women in the 19th century. The machines gave women a sense of independence and mobility that they hadn't enjoyed before, allowing them to leave their houses without having to ask their husbands for a ride. As Anthony once put it, "I think [bicycling] has done more to emancipate women than any one thing in the world. I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes, the picture of untrammeled womanhood."

7. Susan B. Anthony opposed the Fifteenth amendment.

Susan B. Anthony
Susan B. Anthony circa 1890
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

One of the biggest criticisms lobbed against Anthony and Stanton is that they didn’t support the Fifteenth Amendment, which gave black men the right to vote. The pair were upset that the amendment didn't include women, so they splintered from other suffragist groups and formed their own National Woman Suffrage Association. "There was a battle among abolitionists … between having a Fifteenth Amendment that gave black men the vote or holding out for a suffrage amendment that granted the vote to all adult Americans," Lori D. Ginzberg, author of a biography about Stanton, told NPR. Anthony and Stanton opted for the latter, and their decision has been the subject of controversy ever since.

8. Susan B. Anthony was jailed for voting.

A monument at the site where Anthony voted, illegally, in the 1872 election
A monument at the site where Anthony voted, illegally, in the 1872 election

Anthony and 15 other women showed up at the polls to vote in the presidential election of 1872, which pitted Horace Greeley against the incumbent, Ulysses S. Grant. Considering that women were barred from voting at the time, this was a symbolic gesture as well as an act of civil disobedience. (But for what it's worth, Anthony voted for President Grant.) When Anthony was later politely asked by an officer to come down to the precinct to face arrest, she demanded that she be "arrested properly" in the same way a man would be arrested. This request was granted, but her trial wasn’t exactly fair. She wasn't permitted to testify, and the judge instructed the jury to find her guilty. Anthony was ultimately handed a fine of $100, which she refused to pay. Although her actions greatly influenced the suffrage movement, she never did have the chance to vote legally. The Nineteenth Amendment passed 13 years after her death.

9. Susan B. Anthony's face was almost carved into Mount Rushmore.

Workers construct George Washington's image on Mount Rushmore
Rise Studio, Rapid City, S. Dak, Wikimedia Commons // Public domain

In 1937 Congress considered adding Anthony's face to the famed mountain after the Washington and Jefferson portions were completed. However, that idea was scrapped after the House Appropriations Committee said the funds must only be used to complete the sculptures that were already underway (which, at that time, included the Lincoln and Roosevelt sections).

10. Susan B. Anthony was the first woman to appear on circulating U.S. currency.

Susan B. Anthony on the one-dollar coin
Alex Bergin, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The U.S. Treasury Department decided to set a new precedent by putting Anthony's face on a one-dollar coin starting in 1979. However, it looked a little too much like a quarter and cash registers didn’t have a designated space for them, so the coin wasn't widely circulated. Anthony may get a second chance, though, when she appears on the back of the redesigned $10 bill. (The timeline for the redesign, announced in 2016, is currently unclear.) Other influential women expected to appear on the redesigned $10 include Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Sojourner Truth, and Alice Paul.

12 Smart Home Devices to Help You Live Your Best (and Laziest) Life

Amazon/Best Buy
Amazon/Best Buy

The days of having to get off the couch to change the channel or turn off the lights are long over, thanks to the seemingly never-ending flood of smart devices to hit the market. But setting up your smart home isn’t something you should jump right in to. First, you need to find the right hub for your needs, and then you'll need the correct devices that work with it. But once your setup is complete, your thermostat, slow cooker, refrigerator, vacuum, and pretty much anything else you can think of can be controlled by the push of a button or the sound of your voice. Here are some of the devices you may want to consider when making your home a bit smarter this year.

1. Google Home Smart Hub; $100

A Google assistant
Best Buy

If you're ready to commit to Google's smart ecosystem, the Google Home is your starting point. This central hub includes a voice-activated helper (the aptly named Google Assistant) that acts as the central nervous system to your smart home. Once you pair it with your Wi-Fi, the Google Home can answer your questions, tell you the weather, set alarms, and, most importantly, control many of the different smart devices on the market through voice commands. Having all of your most important devices—like smart lights, TVs, and security systems—all going through one hub that you control with your voice is what living lazy is all about. As with any hub, though, do your research and make sure all of your desired smart devices are compatible with it.

Buy it: Best Buy

2. Amazon Echo Show 8; $90

Amazon Echo Show.
Amazon

If you’re looking to go the Amazon route for your hub, start with the Echo Show. It has the Alexa-enabled capabilities of the Dot, but its built-in screen is a great catch-all for displaying photos, watching recipe tutorials in the kitchen, making video calls, and going through the news. Like the Google Home, you can control other smart devices through the Show, so you’ll always be connected to the gadgets around your home. Oh, and while those Show speakers certainly won’t replace a Bose setup anytime soon, they’re more than capable of filling the room with your favorite music.

Buy it: Amazon

3. Sengled Smart Lights; $40

Sengled Lights on Amazon.
Sengled/Amazon

Smart lights are the necessity you never knew you needed. They’re energy-efficient, simple to set up, and even easier to use. And this offering from Sengled, complete with two bulbs and the smart hub, is as good a place to start as any. These lights screw into most sockets around your house, and once in, it’s all a matter of pairing them with the Sengled hub, downloading the app, and learning the ropes. You can control brightness either from your phone or through Alexa or Google voice controls, and there’s even an option to set a schedule, so your lights will turn off and on depending on your personalized timetable. The company also offers colored bulbs capable of millions of different shades and tones.

Buy it: Amazon

4. LG Smart Refrigerator; $1800

A smart refrigerator
Best Buy

This refrigerator from LG is designed to keep your food fresh for longer. It all starts with its InstaView panel, which allows you to get a peek at what's inside without having to open the door over and over again, wasting energy and messing with the temperature in the process. This model also has a smart cooling system (controlled through Alexa or Google Assistant) that continually monitors its temperature and adjusts accordingly, along with two humidity-controlled drawers ideal for storing fruits and vegetables.

Buy it: Best Buy

5. Nest Thermostat; $213

A smart thermostat
Google/Amazon

This Nest thermostat learns your preferred temperatures and adjusts itself to fit your needs. You can set a schedule to have your home at the exact temperature you want, whenever you want it. And if you're at work and temperatures suddenly drop, you can hop on the app and adjust right from the office. To streamline the process, the thermostat comes with all the setup equipment in the box, and there's even a YouTube tutorial online to make installation even easier.

Buy it: Google

6. Pet Food Dispenser; $180

PetSafe food dispenser
PetSafe/Amazon

If you have a dog or cat that insists on being fed the moment you sit down, then this food dispenser is for you. Without getting up, you can schedule feedings right on your phone, whether you're on an iPhone or Android device. Have an animal that eats too quickly? This machine even has a slow-feeder option, which will dispense food over a 15-minute period.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Samsung Smart Outlet; $18

Samsung Smart Outlet.
Samsung/Amazon

If you don't want to invest too much money in smart devices, a smart outlet is a low-cost alternative. This option from Samsung allows you to control power to a non-smart device using the Samsung SmartThings app or through voice commands, via Alexa and Google Assistant. So instead of pulling a plug out of a hard-to-reach outlet every day, you can simply use this smart outlet to control the power from anywhere in the house (or out of the house). It works without needing a pricey hub, so there's far less setup than most smart gadgets. And Samsung's app also offers scheduling capabilities for more personalization. If you're dipping your toe into smarter water or are wary of throwing out your favorite non-smart devices, this is a great starting point.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Smart Instant Pot; $79

An Instant Pot you can use from your smartphone
Instant Pot/Amazon

This Instant Pot does everything a standard model can do—it's a slow cooker, rice cooker, steamer, and sauté pan all in one—but because it's, well, smarter, you can schedule and control cooking times from an app or through your Alexa device. This means you can start and monitor your BBQ pulled chicken from work, so it's perfectly timed when you get back home at night.

Buy it: Amazon

9. Ring Smart Doorbell; $170

Amazon Ring Device.
Amazon/Ring

For Amazon customers in the market for a smart doorbell with a built-in security camera, there’s the Ring. This device lets you see, hear, and talk to anyone at your front door from your smartphone, Amazon Show, PC, and plenty of other devices, even if you’re not home. Other similar options include the Google Nest Hello if you’re a Google Home user—this one boasts similar features as the Ring, with some reviewers touting the Nest’s video quality as superior. And for those not looking to commit to either tech giant, there’s the Arlo smart doorbell, which currently sits at a four-star rating on Amazon.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Smart TV Sticks; Various

A Roku device as sold on Amazon.
Roku/Amazon

When it comes to smart TVs, you don't necessarily need to spend big on the latest set. Instead, a streaming stick, like Roku ($46), Amazon's Fire Stick ($50), or Google's Chromecast ($34), is about as high-tech as you'll need to go. These low-cost options plug right into your non-smart TV's HDMI port and come equipped with streaming apps like Netflix, Hulu, Disney+, and more. And depending on the device you get, most can be paired with Alexa or Google Assistant voice commands or an app, so you can control your binge-watching from your phone.

Buy it: Amazon

11. Eufy Robot Vacuum; $259

Eufy vacuum cleaner
eufy/Amazon

It's 2020—if you don't want to spend your free time pushing a vacuum around the house, make a robot do it for you. Alongside having an app, the eufy robot vacuum is also compatible with both Alexa and Google Assistant, allowing you to start and stop the cleaning process with a simple voice command. The eufy can also run on its own according to whatever schedule you program, so you can have your vacuum working for you while you enjoy a well-deserved weekend off.

Buy it: Amazon

12. Sensibo Smart Air Conditioner Control; $119

Sensibo Smart Air Conditioner Control on Amazon.
Sensibo/Amazon

Control your air conditioner from anywhere with this handy device from Sensibo. You can set a seven-day schedule, so your A/C will turn on and off at the right times on work days and weekends. And on days when temperatures rise quickly, your Sensibo will react on its own and cool things off for you. It's perfect for keeping a cool home for your pets while you're on vacation, and it can pair with your Google Home and Alexa devices to make your ideal temperature just a voice command away.

Buy it: Amazon

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