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6 Fictional Houses You Can Move Into

HookedOnHouses.net
HookedOnHouses.net

Most of us, at one point or another, have coveted a house that's not real. For me, it's the mansion from The Haunting, minus the haunting. While most of us will never realize those real estate dreams, there are a lucky few who have. Here are a few fictional houses you can really move into.

1. The Fredricksen house from Up

The modest but charming domicile Carl Fredricksen improbably flew to South America in Up isn’t in Paradise Falls—it’s in Utah. The house was constructed, with Disney’s permission, by Bangerter Homes.

Fittingly, the home was purchased by a couple of Disney fanatics who had been searching for a place with the Up flavor in California, but were having trouble finding something in their price range. Carl and Ellie’s house was a steal at $400,000. Added bonus: one of the basement bedrooms is decked out to look like Andy’s room from Toy Story. Sure, it's not canon, but it's cute!

Here are a ton of interior pics, including a kitchen that wasn’t actually in the movie but looks like it could have been. I want that fridge.

2. Barbie’s Dream House

If the Barbie girl from Ukraine ever decides she wants to invest in American real estate, I’ve got just the place for her. To celebrate Barbie’s 50th birthday in 2009, Mattel enlisted designer Jonathan Adler to help create a real-life Malibu beach house. If you buy it, I’m going to go ahead and suggest you replace the Barbie-hair chandelier and lamp pulls. But you do what you want.

Actually, the contents of the house were dismantled and some of it was made into a suite at the Palms hotel in Las Vegas, so while you can’t buy the furnished Dream House, you can still get the Barbie experience.

3. The Simpsons’ house

Gizmodo

As part of a 1997 promotion, Fox, Pepsi, and Kaufman and Broad homebuilders sponsored a contest that gave people the chance to win a fully-furnished Simpsons house. No detail was left out, from Duff beer cans to the print on the kitchen curtains.

The winner opted to take $75,000 in cash instead of the house, and Bart’s humble yet colorful abode was converted to a more-or-less normal living space (to the relief of the homeowners' association, no doubt) and sold in 2001, though fans with sharp eyes may still be able to spot the Treehouse of Terror in the backyard.

4. The Haunted Mansion

Not only does this house bear more than a passing resemblance to Disneyland’s plantation-style Haunted Mansion on the outside, it has a few ghostly surprises on the inside as well. A Disney contractor built this Duluth, Ga., house in 1996, but is now selling it to move on to more Disney-themed projects, such as a house themed after Disneyland’s Grand Californian hotel and a Hawaiian pool based on the Jungle Cruise.

Looks to me like the house is still listed, so if you’re looking for the ultimate souvenir and have a spare $873,000, look into it. Oh, and about those ghostly surprises:

5. Tron in Milan

Crave

To promote Tron: Legacy in 2011, Disney partnered with DuPont to make a Grid-inspired home in Milan that was on display during Milan Design Week. That's the kitchen in the picture, but you can also check out the "bathroom and wellness area" and a bedroom fit for a Flynn.

6. The Batcave

Elite Home Theater

Consider this an honorable mention, because it's not a full-sized house—but it's just as impressive. Elite Home Theaters constructed this 12,000 square foot home theater for a fan reportedly located in Greenwich, Conn. The theater, which cost $2 million, includes a secret room that houses the Batmobile, a Batcomputer and an "escape tunnel." No word on whether Alfred is included in the deal. The same company is apparently also working on a Pirates of the Caribbean home theater.

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Peter Macdiarmid, Getty Images
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Long-Closed Part of Westminster Abbey to Open to the Public for the First Time in 700 Years
The triforium in 2009
The triforium in 2009
Peter Macdiarmid, Getty Images

On June 11, 2018, visitors to London's Westminster Abbey will get a look at a section of the historic church that has been off-limits for 700 years. That’s when the triforium, located high above the abbey floor, will open to the general public for the first time as the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Galleries, according to Condé Nast Traveler.

The 13th-century space, located 70 feet above the nave floor, had previously been used for abbey storage. (One architecture critic who visited before the renovation described it as a “glorified attic.”) After a $32.5 million renovation, it will now become a museum with killer views.

The view from the triforium looking down onto the rest of Westminster Abbey
The view from the triforium looking down toward the ground floor of the abbey
Dan Kitwood, Getty Images

To access the area, which looks out over the nave and altar, architects built a new tower, the abbey’s first major addition since 1745. The 80-foot-tall, window-lined structure will provide brand-new vantage points to look out on surrounding areas of Westminster. Inside the triforium, the windows of the galleries look out onto the Houses of Parliament and St. Margaret’s church, and visitors will be able to walk around the upper mezzanine and look down onto the ground floor of the abbey below.

The museum itself will show off objects from Westminster Abbey’s history, such as a 17th-century coronation chair for Mary II and an altarpiece from Henry III’s reign, when the triforium was first constructed. Oh, and it will also display Prince William and Kate Middleton’s marriage license, for those interested in more modern royal history.

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]

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Steinar Skaar / Statens vegvesen
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A Look at One of Norway's Most Beautiful Public Bathrooms
Steinar Skaar / Statens vegvesen
Steinar Skaar / Statens vegvesen

In Norway, beautiful architecture isn’t limited to new museums and opera houses. The country also has some incredible bathrooms, thanks to a program called the National Tourist Routes, which commissions architects to design imaginative, beautiful rest stops and lookout points to encourage travel in some of the country’s more remote areas.

One of the latest projects to be unveiled, as Dezeen alerted us, is a high-design commode in the northern Norwegian municipality of Gildeskål. The newly renovated site located along the Norwegian Scenic Route Helgelandskysten, called Ureddplassen, was recently opened to the public.

Bench seating outside the restroom, with mountains in the background
Lars Grimsby / State Road Administration

A view up the stairs of the amphitheater toward steep mountains
Steinar Skaar / Statens vegvesen

Designed by the Oslo-based designers Haugen/Zohar Architects and the landscape architects Landskapsfabrikken AS, the site includes an amphitheater, a viewing platform, and of course, a beautiful restroom. The area is a popular place to view the Northern Lights in the fall and winter and the midnight sun in the summer, so it sees a fair amount of traffic.

The site has been home to a monument honoring victims of the 1943 sinking of a World War II submarine called the Uredd since 1987, and the designers added a new marble base to the monument as part of this project.

A view of the monument to the soldiers lost in the sinking of the Uredd
Steinar Skaar / Statens vegvesen

Now, travelers and locals alike can stop off the highway for a quick pee in the restroom, with its rolling concrete and glass design, then plop down on the steps of the amphitheater to gaze at the view across the Norwegian Sea. It’s one rest stop you’ll actually want to rest at.

[h/t Dezeen]

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