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6 Fictional Houses You Can Move Into

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HookedOnHouses.net

Most of us, at one point or another, have coveted a house that's not real. For me, it's the mansion from The Haunting, minus the haunting. While most of us will never realize those real estate dreams, there are a lucky few who have. Here are a few fictional houses you can really move into.

1. The Fredricksen house from Up

The modest but charming domicile Carl Fredricksen improbably flew to South America in Up isn’t in Paradise Falls—it’s in Utah. The house was constructed, with Disney’s permission, by Bangerter Homes.

Fittingly, the home was purchased by a couple of Disney fanatics who had been searching for a place with the Up flavor in California, but were having trouble finding something in their price range. Carl and Ellie’s house was a steal at $400,000. Added bonus: one of the basement bedrooms is decked out to look like Andy’s room from Toy Story. Sure, it's not canon, but it's cute!

Here are a ton of interior pics, including a kitchen that wasn’t actually in the movie but looks like it could have been. I want that fridge.

2. Barbie’s Dream House

If the Barbie girl from Ukraine ever decides she wants to invest in American real estate, I’ve got just the place for her. To celebrate Barbie’s 50th birthday in 2009, Mattel enlisted designer Jonathan Adler to help create a real-life Malibu beach house. If you buy it, I’m going to go ahead and suggest you replace the Barbie-hair chandelier and lamp pulls. But you do what you want.

Actually, the contents of the house were dismantled and some of it was made into a suite at the Palms hotel in Las Vegas, so while you can’t buy the furnished Dream House, you can still get the Barbie experience.

3. The Simpsons’ house

Gizmodo

As part of a 1997 promotion, Fox, Pepsi, and Kaufman and Broad homebuilders sponsored a contest that gave people the chance to win a fully-furnished Simpsons house. No detail was left out, from Duff beer cans to the print on the kitchen curtains.

The winner opted to take $75,000 in cash instead of the house, and Bart’s humble yet colorful abode was converted to a more-or-less normal living space (to the relief of the homeowners' association, no doubt) and sold in 2001, though fans with sharp eyes may still be able to spot the Treehouse of Terror in the backyard.

4. The Haunted Mansion

Not only does this house bear more than a passing resemblance to Disneyland’s plantation-style Haunted Mansion on the outside, it has a few ghostly surprises on the inside as well. A Disney contractor built this Duluth, Ga., house in 1996, but is now selling it to move on to more Disney-themed projects, such as a house themed after Disneyland’s Grand Californian hotel and a Hawaiian pool based on the Jungle Cruise.

Looks to me like the house is still listed, so if you’re looking for the ultimate souvenir and have a spare $873,000, look into it. Oh, and about those ghostly surprises:

5. Tron in Milan

Crave

To promote Tron: Legacy in 2011, Disney partnered with DuPont to make a Grid-inspired home in Milan that was on display during Milan Design Week. That's the kitchen in the picture, but you can also check out the "bathroom and wellness area" and a bedroom fit for a Flynn.

6. The Batcave

Elite Home Theater

Consider this an honorable mention, because it's not a full-sized house—but it's just as impressive. Elite Home Theaters constructed this 12,000 square foot home theater for a fan reportedly located in Greenwich, Conn. The theater, which cost $2 million, includes a secret room that houses the Batmobile, a Batcomputer and an "escape tunnel." No word on whether Alfred is included in the deal. The same company is apparently also working on a Pirates of the Caribbean home theater.

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FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images
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Design
China's New Tianjin Binhai Library is Breathtaking—and Full of Fake Books
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FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

A massive new library in Tianjin, China, is gaining international fame among bibliophiles and design buffs alike. As Arch Daily reports, the five-story Tianjin Binhai Library has capacity for more than 1 million books, which visitors can read in a spiraling, modernist auditorium with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves.

Several years ago, municipal officials in Tianjin commissioned a team of Dutch and Japanese architects to design five new buildings, including the library, for a cultural center in the city’s Binhai district. A glass-covered public corridor connects these structures, but the Tianjin Binhai Library is still striking enough to stand out on its own.

The library’s main atrium could be compared to that of the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Guggenheim Museum in New York City. But there's a catch: Its swirling bookshelves don’t actually hold thousands of books. Look closer, and you’ll notice that the shelves are printed with digital book images. About 200,000 real books are available in other rooms of the library, but the jaw-dropping main room is primarily intended for socialization and reading, according to Mashable.

The “shelves”—some of which can also serve as steps or seating—ascend upward, curving around a giant mirrored sphere. Together, these elements resemble a giant eye, prompting visitors to nickname the attraction “The Eye of Binhai,” reports Newsweek. In addition to its dramatic main auditorium, the 36,000-square-foot library also contains reading rooms, lounge areas, offices, and meeting spaces, and has two rooftop patios.

Following a three-year construction period, the Tianjin Binhai Library opened on October 1, 2017. Want to visit, but can’t afford a trip to China? Take a virtual tour by checking out the photos below.

A general view of the Tianjin Binhai Library
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

People visiting China's Tianjin Binhai Library.
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

A general view of China's Tianjin Binhai Library.
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

A woman taking pictures at China's Tianjin Binhai Library.
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

A man visiting China's Tianjin Binhai Library.
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

A woman looking at books at China's Tianjin Binhai Library.
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

A general view of China's Tianjin Binhai Library.
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

People visiting China's Tianjin Binhai Library.
FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images

[h/t Newsweek]

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Pol Viladoms
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architecture
One of Gaudí's Most Famous Homes Opens to the Public for the First Time
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Pol Viladoms

Visiting buildings designed by iconic Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí is on the to-do list of nearly every tourist passing through Barcelona, Spain, but there's always been one important design that visitors could only view from the outside. Constructed between 1883 and 1885, Casa Vicens was the first major work in Gaudí's influential career, but it has been under private ownership for its entire existence. Now, for the first time, visitors have the chance to see inside the colorful building. The house opened as a museum on November 16, as The Art Newspaper reports.

Gaudí helped spark the Catalan modernism movement with his opulent spaces and structures like Park Güell, Casa Batlló, and La Sagrada Familia. You can see plenty of his architecture around Barcelona, but the eccentric Casa Vicens is regarded as his first masterpiece, famous for its white-and-green tiles and cast-iron gate. Deemed a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2005, Casa Vicens is a treasured part of the city's landscape, yet it has never been open to the public.

Then, in 2014 the private Spanish bank MoraBanc bought the property with the intention of opening it up to visitors. The public is finally welcome to take a look inside following a $5.3 million renovation. To restore the 15 rooms to their 19th-century glory, designers referred to historical archives and testimonies from the descendants of former residents, making sure the house looked as much like Gaudí's original work as possible. As you can see in the photos below, the restored interiors are just as vibrant as the walls outside, with geometric designs and nature motifs incorporated throughout.

In addition to the stunning architecture, museum guests will find furniture designed by Gaudí, audio-visual materials tracing the history of the house and its architect, oil paintings by the 19th-century Catalan artist Francesc Torrescassana i Sallarés, and a rotating exhibition. Casa Vicens is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. General admission costs about $19 (€16).

An empty room in the interior of Casa Vicens

Interior of house with a fountain and arched ceilings

One of the house's blue-and-white tiled bathrooms

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

All images courtesy of Pol Viladoms.

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