15 Things You Didn't Know About DuckTales

Even if your life wasn't like a hurricane in 1987—no race cars lasers, or aeroplanes—you may have been a DuckTales fan. As fans await Disney's reboot of the series, which will premiere this summer with Danny Pudi, Ben Schwartz, Bobby Moynihan, and David Tennant, here are a few facts about Scrooge McDuck and his daring grand-nephews.

1. SCROOGE EARNED HIS LUCKY NUMBER ONE DIME BY GIVING A SHOESHINE IN HIS HOMETOWN OF GLASGOW WHEN HE WAS JUST 10 YEARS OLD.

That's according to Don Rosa’s Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck comic. And it’s not just any old dime—it is, specifically, a 1875 or 1857 (depending on which comic you read) Seated Liberty dime. Depending on which year it is and the condition it’s in, that dime would be worth up to $700 today. It's not much compared to Scrooge's massive money pit, but it's nothing to sneeze at.

2. ALAN YOUNG, WHO WAS THE VOICE OF SCROOGE, WAS ARGUABLY MORE WELL-KNOWN FOR HIS WORK WITH ANOTHER NON-HUMAN: MR. ED.

Alan Young played Wilbur Post, the famous talking horse's owner. Huey, Dewey, Louie, and Webby were voiced by Russi Taylor, who was also the voice of Minnie Mouse.

3. IF THE SHOW HAD FOLLOWED THE COMICS MORE CLOSELY, DONALD DUCK WOULD HAVE BEEN PART OF THE DUCKTALES GANG.

Disney producers decided that they really wanted the focus to be on the stingy Scot, so they took Donald out of the equation. (In the upcoming reboot, Donald is known as “one of the most daring adventurers of all time.”)

4. MARK MUELLER, THE MAN RESPONSIBLE FOR THAT OH-SO-CATCHY THEME SONG, ALSO WROTE THE CHIP ‘N’ DALE RESCUE RANGERS THEME SONG.

Ok, that makes sense. But how about this: He also wrote Jennifer Paige’s “Crush” and Amy Grant’s “That’s What Love is For.”

5. EXACTLY HOW BIG IS SCROOGE’S MONEY BIN? THREE CUBIC ACRES.

Which doesn’t make sense, of course, and I’ll let author and economic historian John Steele Gordon tell you why. This is what he noted to the Wall Street Journal in 2005:

“An acre is a measure of area (i.e. two dimensions). If you have a ‘cubic acre,’ you would have a four-dimensional space—a three-dimensional space existing in a specific time frame. Hell, add another dimension and you get a late-'60s soul/R&B singing group. A cubic acre, of course, is Carl Barks's wonderfully meaningless measurement of Scrooge's infinite wealth. Lewis Carroll would have loved it. But as a child I calculated that a cubic acre would have a side 208.7 feet long (square root of 43,560) and thus a volume of 9,090,972 cubic feet. So Scrooge's money bin would have been 27,272,916 cubic feet in size, an adequate piggy bank by any measure.”

A later story by Don Rosa, however, showed blueprints for the vault that pegged its size as 127 feet by 120 feet.

6. BEAGLE BOYS LEADER MA BEAGLE WAS MODELED AFTER THE INFAMOUS MA BARKER OF THE BARKER-KARPIS GANG.

An incomplete lineup of Beagle Boys includes Bigtime, Burger, Bouncer, Baggy, Bankjob, Bugle, Bebop, Babyface, Megabyte, Bomber, Backwoods, Bacon, Bullseye, Bulkhead, Butterball, Bombshell, Bankroll and Brainstorm.

7. DARKWING DUCK WAS INSPIRED BY THE DUCKTALES EPISODE “DOUBLE O' DUCK.”

In fact, Darkwing was originally called Double O' Duck, and would have starred wannabe spies Launchpad McQuack and Gizmoduck.

8. THE DUCKTALES VIDEO GAME HAD AN ALTERNATE ENDING.

If you managed to beat the DuckTales game but bankrupted Scrooge, you were one of a select few people who saw the alternate “Sad Scrooge” ending. Thanks to the magic of YouTube, you don’t have to manage that particular feat. Voila!

9. YOU CAN STILL PLAY THE ORIGINAL DUCKTALES GAME ONLINE.

You're welcome? (Just don’t blame me when your productivity plummets this weekend.)

10. ACCORDING TO THE EPISODE "DOUBLE O' DUCK," DUCKBURG IS HOME TO ABOUT 315,000 RESIDENTS.

That makes it roughly the size of St. Louis.

11. IT'S HARD TO SAY WHERE DUCKBURG IS, EXACTLY.

The comic books place the town in Calisota, a fictional state in the U.S. But Calisota itself seems to move about the country, depending on the artist, the storyline, and whether we're talking comic book or TV series. Various maps have showed it on the west coast, in Pittsburgh, and even somewhere near Virginia.

12. CARL BARKS TOOK HIS INSPIRATION FOR MAGICA DE SPELL FROM TWO ITALIAN ACTRESSES: GINA LOLLOBRIGIDA AND SOPHIA LOREN.

He was also inspired by Morticia Addams. “Disney’s always had witches who were ugly and repulsive,” Barks once said. “Why shouldn’t I draw one that’s not ugly, but outright sexy?”

Getty/Disney Wikia

13. CRITICS WEREN'T PARTICULARLY KIND TO DUCKTALES AT FIRST.

The Los Angeles Times believed the public was going to be hugely disappointed in the quality of the animation, and wondered why anyone would try to give Scrooge more dimension when people already loved him as a money-hoarding miser.

14. THE SHOW'S APPEAL WAS UNIVERSAL.

In 1991, DuckTales became the first American cartoon to be shown in the former Soviet Union.

15. WITHOUT THE ADVENTURES OF SCROOGE AND THE BOYS, INDIANA JONES MAY NOT HAVE EXISTED.

According to D23, the official Disney fan club, both George Lucas and Steven Spielberg have said that the gang's comic capers heavily influenced Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Why Air Supply Changed the Lyrics to “All Out of Love” for American Fans

Air Supply.
Air Supply.
Peter Carrette Archive/Getty Images

Sometimes one minor detail can make all the difference. A case study for this principle comes in the form of the pop music act Air Supply, which enjoyed success in the 1980s thanks to mellow hits like “Lost in Love,” “Every Woman in the World,” and "Making Love Out of Nothing at All." Their 1980 single “All Out of Love” is among that laundry list, though it needed one major tweak before becoming palatable for American audiences.

The Air Supply duo of Graham Russell and Russell Hitchcock hailed from Australia, and it was one particular bit of phrasing in “All Out of Love” that may have proven difficult for Americans to grasp. According to an interview with Russell on Songfacts, the lyrics to the song when it became a hit in their home country in 1978 were:

I’m all out of love

I want to arrest you

By “arrest,” Russell explained, he meant capturing someone’s attention. Naturally, most listeners would have found this puzzling. Before the song was released in the United States, Air Supply’s producer, Clive Davis, suggested it be changed to:

I’m all out of love

I’m so lost without you

I know you were right

Davis’s argument was that the “arrest” line was “too weird” and would sink the song’s chances. He also recommended adding “I know you were right.”

Davis proved to be correct when “All Out of Love” reached the number two spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in February 1980.

While it would be reasonable to assume “I want to arrest you” is a common phrase of affection in Australia, it isn’t. “I think that was just me using a weird word,” Russell said. “But, you know, now [that] I think of it, it’s definitely very weird.”

Russell added that arrest joins a list of words that are probably best left out of a love song, and that cabbage and cauliflower would be two others.

[h/t Songfacts]

In 1995, You Could Smell Like Kermit the Frog

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images
Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

The mid-'90s were a great time for Kermit the Frog. In 1996 alone, he led the Tournament of Roses Parade, was the face of the 40-year-old Muppet brand, and had both a movie (Muppet Treasure Island) and a television show (Muppets Live!) to promote. His career could not have been hotter, so Kermit did what any multifaceted, single-person empire does while sitting atop his or her celebrity throne: he released a fragrance. Amphibia, produced by Jim Henson Productions, was dripping with froggy sex appeal. The unisex perfume—its slogan was "pour homme, femme, et frog"—had a clean, citrusy smell with a hint of moss to conjure up memories of the swamp. Offered exclusively at Bloomingdale's in Manhattan, it sold for $18.50 (or $32.50 for those who wanted a gift box and T-shirt).

There’s no trace of a commercial for the perfume—which is a shame, since Amphibia is a word that begs to be whispered—but a print ad and photos of the packaging still live online. The six-pack and strategically-placed towel are an apt parody ... and also deeply unsettling.

Amphibia was the most-sold fragrance at the Manhattan Bloomingdale's in the 1995 Christmas season. "Kids are buying it, grown-ups are buying it, and frogs are really hot," pitchman Max Almenas told The New York Times.

It was a hit past the Christmas season, too: The eau de Muppet was cheekily reviewed by Mary Roach—who would go on to write Stiff and Packing for Mars—in a 1996 issue of TV Guide. "I wore Amphibia on my third date ... he said he found me riveting which I heard as ribbitting, as in 'ribbit, ribbit,' and I got all defensive," she wrote. "He assured me I didn't smell like a swamp ... I stuck my tongue out at him, to which he responded that it was the wrong time of year for flies, and besides, the food would be arriving shortly."

Not to be outdone, Miss Piggy also released a fragrance a few years later. It was, naturally, called Moi.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER