11 Surprising Facts About Cat Adoptions

iStock
iStock

Adopting a furry friend can bring a lot of joy into your life. In addition to providing a pal for life, getting a cat can lower stress and potentially save your life, so you should get one (or two) immediately. In celebration of National Adopt a Shelter Cat Month in June, here are 11 things you might not know about cat adoptions:

1. FEWER CATS ARE ENDING UP IN SHELTERS THESE DAYS.

While plenty of cats still enter shelters each year, that number is on the downswing. The ASPCA estimates that across the U.S., about 3.2 million cats enter animal shelters each year, which is down from just a few years ago.

2. ADOPTION IS ONE OF THE MOST COMMON WAYS TO GET A NEW CAT.

When it comes to getting a new cat, most people are heading to a shelter according to the ASPCA's figures, not a breeder. About 31 percent of cats entering new homes come from shelters, according to the association’s estimates, while 28 percent come from friends or relatives. Just 3 percent come from breeders. (Some 39 percent come from "other" sources.) The American Pet Product Association’s annual survey is even more hopeful: The 2016 survey found that 46 percent of people acquire their cats from a shelter, up from 43 percent in 2013.

3. KITTENS ARE EVEN MORE POPULAR THAN YOU THINK.

Gray kitten playing on a mat.
iStock

People prefer adopting kittens over cats more than they do adopting puppies over dogs, according to an analysis of Petfinder.com adoptions by Priceonomics. While 95 percent of puppies get adopted compared to 75 percent of young dogs and 68 percent of senior dogs, the rates drop much faster for cats. About 82 percent of kittens get adopted, but as they get older the likelihood drops, and once they pass around 18 months old, only 60 percent of cats get adopted.

4. BLACK CATS DON’T HAVE TROUBLE GETTING ADOPTED.

It’s a myth that black animals are adopted at lower rates than pets of other colors, according to data compiled by the ASPCA. In a review of 14 regions of the U.S. and about 300,000 dogs and cats up for adoption, the study found that black cats comprised 31 percent of cat adoptions, compared to 20 percent gray cats and 18 percent brown cats. The overabundance of black kitties in shelters may just be a matter of numbers: The genes that cause black coloration are dominant, so it stands to reason that there would be more black cats in general.

5. BUT COLOR DOES SEEM TO MATTER.

According to that same Priceonomics study, tuxedo cats—meaning black and white—get adopted at lower rates than any other color. Gray cats and orange tabbies get adopted at the highest rates, according to their numbers. (However, those numbers vary from what the ASPCA estimates—in the Priceonomics study, brown cats were more likely to get adopted than black cats, for instance.)

6. MANY CATS END UP IN SHELTERS BECAUSE OF HOUSING ISSUES.

Person's hand petting a cat who is sitting in a cage.
iStock

The kitties that end up waiting for new homes at rescues and shelters aren’t necessarily there because they were strays or because of behavioral issues. A high number of people who relinquish their cats do so because they have to move and their new housing situation doesn’t allow pets. In a study of pets given up for adoption from dozens of shelters run by the Australian Royal Society for the Protection and Care of Animals, the most commonly cited reason for giving up a cat was housing related. Only 4 percent of relinquished cats were given up because of behavioral issues.

7. TWO MIGHT BE BETTER THAN ONE.

Adopting a pair of cats might actually be less work than getting a solo kitty. That’s because bonded pairs can keep each other company, meaning they need less attention from you, and are less likely to take out their boredom or anxiety on your house. Since they’ll be eating at the same time and likely using the same litter box, it’s not that much different from dealing with a single cat. Shelters often give discounts to adoptees who take home a pair of cats, too, so it’s much cheaper (not to mention less stressful) than going back and getting another pet a year later once you realize that you can never have enough cats.

8. OUTGOING CATS GET ADOPTED FIRST.

In a 2012 study of 1600 people who adopted dogs and cats, behavioral characteristics tended to influence cat adoptions more than any other factor. While dog owners were more likely to cite appearance as the deciding factor in choosing their new pet, cat adopters were more concerned with how their new kitty acted, and how shelter workers described its behavior. Most cat adopters reported that their new pet approached and greeted them at the shelter, indicating that people like to adopt cats that are outgoing from the start.

9. IF YOU WANT TO ADOPT, YOU'LL NEED REFERENCES.

Gray Maine Coon kitten looking at camera.
iStock

Getting a cat from a rescue group often requires more than just showing up with the adoption fee. You’ll probably need to fill out an application that asks about your experience with pets, your plans for caring for your new cat, and a list of references that can vouch for the fact that you're a compassionate human capable of taking on a new pet. Sometimes these applications can be extensive, but they exist for good reason: In a survey of more than 570 pet adopters in several U.S. cities, 11 percent relinquished their pet back to the shelter within the first six months [PDF].

10. YES, YOUR CATS CAN LEARN TO GET ALONG.

While experts recommend introducing a new cat into the household gradually to ensure a good relationship between it and the cat you already have, getting the process just right might not be totally necessary. A 2005 study of 375 cat adopters found that 44 percent of owners introduced their new cat to their established pet immediately, while 22 percent introduced the cats to each other after a few days and 33 percent introduced them more gradually. However, the method of introduction didn't make or break the situation, at least when it came to overt fighting—22 percent of owners, regardless of introduction method, said their cats accepted each other immediately, while 40 percent said it happened within a month. While gradual introductions might help reduce the stress of meeting a new cat and ensure they become friends later, many cats will learn to at least tolerate each other regardless. (But again, almost all experts do recommend the gradual introduction approach to keep everyone happy.)

11. IT'S A LONG-TERM COMMITMENT.

Even if you adopt an adult cat (and you should!), your new friend will likely be with you for years to come. While the 38-year lifespan of Creme Puff, the world’s longest-living cat on record, might be unusual, indoor cats live for an average of 12 to 15 years. And it’s not rare for well-cared-for cats to live longer, depending on the breed—the average lifespan of a Persian is 17, and it’s perfectly normal for some cats to live to be 20 years old.

How to Keep a Cat Out of Your Christmas Tree

MW47/iStock via Getty Images
MW47/iStock via Getty Images

You may be able to resist poking around the Christmas tree until December 25, but your cat has different plans. The tree you spent hours decorating is nothing more than an oversized toy to the feline in your home. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to dissuade your pet from swatting away all your hard work.

As Lifehacker reports, an elaborate skirt is the key to a cat-friendly tree. If a cat loves the soft, fluffy material beneath the tree, it may lose interest in the branches overhead. A different approach is to use the skirt as an opportunity to create an uninviting barrier between your cat and the tree. It's hard to mess with ornaments when they're hanging above a layer of tape laid out sticky-side up, or even a bed of pinecones if you want something that looks more natural.

Some curious cats can't be deterred by a few obstacles in their way. For these cases, PetCareRx recommends using a safe cat repellent. There are many smells cats can't stand, like bitter apple, citronella, potpourri, and even Vicks VapoRub. You can either spray pine cones or cotton balls with these scents and tuck them around the tree, or spray them directly onto the branches. Your cat will suddenly be repulsed by the shiny new object in the living room, plus your tree will smell a little more festive—especially if it's fake.

Even after taking these precautions, it helps to have a few more safeguards in place. Limiting ornaments to the top half of the tree where they'll be out of kitty's reach, and securing them with strings instead of wire hooks, means they're less likely to end up on the ground or in your pet's paws. Location is also crucial—setting up your tree right next to a sofa or another piece of furniture your cat likes to climb on is like inviting him to use it as a launchpad.

If you're thinking of skipping the traditional tree altogether this year, here are some regional alternatives.

[h/t Lifehacker]

Treat Your Achy Back to a Cozy, Vibrating Sloth Pillow This Winter

Smoko
Smoko

Battling your way through the biting winds of winter just to get to your office or run a simple errand—even if you’re just dashing a few yards to and from your car—can make your body feel like it’s been through an actual battle. And while cold weather definitely justifies curling up on the couch under a weighted blanket for hours on end, sometimes a regular throw pillow just isn’t enough to soothe your stiff muscles.

Smoko’s plush boo pillow from Urban Outfitters ($49), however, just might do the trick. Not only does it have a fleece exterior, it also vibrates: Just press the power button on the right arm, and the pillow will give you a subtle, relaxing massage to sink into while you binge-watch whatever television series your friends won’t stop talking about. According to PopSugar, it comes with three AA batteries, so you don’t have to worry about bundling back up for a last-minute trip to the convenience store after you realize the only batteries you have are in your TV remote.

The smiling sloth face on the front gives you the impression that you’re being hugged by the world’s cutest, coziest arboreal mammal. There’s also a handle on the top of the pillow, so you can easily relocate from the couch to your bed whenever you feel like it.

In short, the sloth-themed pillow might make you actually look forward to hearing your local meteorologist drop the term “wintry mix” in the forecast. And, at $49, it’s an ideal gift for anyone on your list who loves sloths and/or enjoys indulging in sloth-like behavior.

You can get one (or more) from Urban Outfitters here—and, for the full effect, why not pair it with a nice ugly Christmas sweater? Here are our 11 favorites.

[h/t PopSugar]

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER