100 Years After It Sank, This Coast Guard Ship Will Remain in Its Watery Grave

NOAA/USCG/Video Ray
NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

On June 13, 1917, a United States Coast Guard ship named the McCulloch sank off the coast of Southern California. Now, 100 years after the vessel met its end, the Associated Press reports that the military ship has been discovered at the bottom of the Pacific.

The USCGC McCulloch was part of the Asiatic Squadron, a group of U.S. Navy warships that fought in the 1898 Battle of Manila Bay during the Spanish-American War. At the time, it was the largest cutter ever built, and the first boat of its kind to sail through the Suez Canal and the Indian Ocean [PDF].

Mare Island Museum

In April 1917, during World War I, the USCGC McCulloch was transferred to the Navy for duty. Two months later, while patrolling the foggy coastline, the boat collided with a steamship named the SS Governor. The USCGC McCulloch’s crew escaped, but the boat itself wasn't so lucky: In just 35 minutes, it sank to the ocean’s bottom. One crewman died; the rest were rescued.

The USCGC McCulloch sat undisturbed in its watery grave for nearly a century. But last fall, during a routine survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Coast Guard located the wreck three miles off the coast of Point Conception, California. Officials announced the discovery on Tuesday, on the 100th anniversary of the ship’s sinking.

NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

NOAA/USCG/Video Ray

Officials said they don’t plan on moving the fragile boat, as the ocean's strong currents and thick clouds of sediment would make it difficult to do so without significantly damaging it. Instead, the USCGC McCulloch will sit on the sea floor for eternity as "a symbol of hard work and sacrifice of previous generations to serve and protect our nation,” Coast Guard commander Todd Sokalzuk reportedly said in his announcement.

[h/t Associated Press]

Thursday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Guitar Kits, Memory-Foam Pillows, and Smartwatches

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 3. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

Archaeologists Discover the Jousting Yard Where Henry VIII Had His Historic Accident

National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Henry VIII may have never earned his reputation as an ill-mannered tyrant if it weren't for injuries he sustained at age 44. Now, as Live Science reports, archaeologists have uncovered the infamous jousting yard where that history-changing accident took place.

Prior to the beheading of Anne Boleyn—his second of six wives—King Henry VIII was regarded as a kind, gregarious leader by those who knew him. The point where descriptions of him changed their tone coincided with a fall he took on January 24, 1536.

While jousting at Greenwich Palace, Henry was tossed from his armored horse and further injured when his steed fell on top of him. The incident caused him to lose consciousness for two hours and nearly cost him his life.

Though it was never diagnosed, some experts believe Henry VIII sustained a brain injury that day that altered his personality. From that point on, he was characterized as irritable and cruel. He was in constant pain from migraines and an ulcerated leg, which could also explain the mood shift. The (sometimes violent) dissolution of most of his marriages occurred post-accident.

Ruins of the jousting yard, or tiltyard, where that fateful incident took place are located 5.5 feet beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, the former site of Greenwich Palace. After falling into disrepair, the palace was demolished by Charles II, and the exact location of the tiltyard was forgotten. A team of archaeologists led by Simon Withers of the University of Greenwich used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to locate the remnants buried beneath the ground earlier this year.

The giveaways were the footprints of two octagonal towers. The archaeologists say these were likely the foundations of the bleacher-like viewing stands where spectators watched jousting matches. That would place the historic tiltyard about 330 feet east of where it was originally thought to be situated.

The radar scans provided a peek at what lies beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, but to learn more, the archaeologists will need to get their hands dirty. Their next step will be digging up the site to get a better look at the ruins.

[h/t Live Science]