A Microsoft Font Might Have Revealed Political Corruption in Pakistan

iStock
iStock

Note to wrongdoers: Check your fonts. Right now in Pakistan, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and his family are in legal hot water over what might be falsified government disclosures, according to Slate. The proof? The typeface used in the documents, as the investigative report submitted to Pakistan's Supreme Court notes.

Calibri, the sans-serif typeface that serves as the default for Microsoft applications, was designed in the early 2000s. But it didn't become widely available to the public until Microsoft Vista and its accompanying Office update were released in 2007.

This is where things have gotten tricky for the prime minister. His daughter may have fabricated documents that would show that she and her family had made the proper official disclosures on their finances. The documents, which were supposedly signed in 2006, were written with Calibri—a year before it was released to the public.

Defense lawyers argue, of course, that Maryam Nawaz Sharif could have just had access to Calibri before Windows Vista came out, since it was designed before 2007. The typeface's designer, Lucas de Groot, has said that the very first release he was aware of came out in 2006 as part of beta testing for the Vista operating system. But based on the sheer size of the files involved in such a beta product, it would have required "serious effort to get," a representative for LucasFonts told the Pakistani news outlet Dawn. And that would have been a super early test version, since the first public beta didn't come out until June 2006, four months after the documents were supposedly signed. Unless she was a huge computer nerd, Maryam probably didn't have access to Calibri back in early 2006, indicating the documents were faked. 

Whether you're turning in a term paper or falsifying legal documents, you're always better off going with Times New Roman.

[h/t Slate]

These Rugged Steel-Toe Boots Look and Feel Like Summer Sneakers

Indestructible Shoes
Indestructible Shoes

Thanks to new, high-tech materials, our favorite shoes are lighter and more comfortable than ever. Unfortunately, one thing most sneakers are not is durable. They can’t protect your feet from the rain, let alone heavy objects. Luckily, as their name implies, Indestructible Shoes has come up with a line of steel-toe boots that look and feel like regular sneakers.

Made to be incredibly strong but still lightweight, every pair of Indestructible Shoes has steel toes, skid-proof grips, and shock-absorption technology. But they don't look clunky or bulky, which makes them suitable whether you're going to work, the gym, or a family gathering.

The Hummer is Indestructible Shoes’s most well-rounded model. It features European steel toes to protect your feet, while the durable "flymesh" material wicks moisture to keep your feet feeling fresh. The insole features 3D arch support and extra padding in the heel cup. And the outsole features additional padding that distributes weight and helps your body withstand strain.

Indestructible Shoes Hummer.
The Hummer from Indestructible Shoes.
Indestructible Shoes

There’s also the Xciter, Indestructible Shoes’s latest design. The company prioritized comfort for this model, with the same steel toes as the Hummer, but with additional extra-large, no-slip outsoles capable of gripping even smooth, slippery surfaces—like, say, a boat deck. The upper is made of breathable moisture-wicking flymesh to help keep your feet dry in the rain or if you're wearing them on the water.

If you want a more breathable shoe for the peak summer months, there's the Ryder. This shoe is designed to be a stylish solution to the problem of sweaty feet, thanks to a breathable mesh that maximizes airflow and minimizes sweat and odor. Meanwhile, extra padding in the midsole will keep your feet protected.

You can get 44 percent off all styles if you order today.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Key West Has Installed Permanent Rainbow Crosswalks

In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
In Key West, rainbow crosswalks aren't just for Pride Month.
Maxvis/iStock via Getty Images

In 2015, Key West became the first place in Florida to install permanent rainbow crosswalks—a celebration of LGBTQ+ pride that reflected the city’s “One Human Family” motto. But a few years later, the city decided to repave its historic Duval Street, which required tearing up the four colorful paths at the intersection of Petronia Street.

The rainbow crosswalks finally returned this week—just in time for Pride Month—and they’re even more vibrant than before. The old ones were essentially regular white crosswalks with each empty space filled in with a different color, whereas the new paths feature long, colored stripes with a white stripe along the top and bottom edges.

According to NBC 6 South Florida, workers positioned the thermoplastic stripes on the street and attached them to the pavement below with heat from propane torches. Key West mayor Teri Johnson and other officials then commemorated the new landmarks, located in the heart of the city's entertainment district, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. (The ribbon was also rainbow colored, and all participants wore masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus.)

“The rainbow crosswalks mean that everybody is welcome, everybody is equal, everybody is recognized, and that we do really abide by the ‘One Human Family’ spirit,” Johnson said.

Key West isn’t the only place with permanent rainbow paths; as LGBTQ Nation reports, you can find them in San Francisco, West Hollywood, Seattle, Philadelphia, Toronto, and other cities, too. And while the small island city has postponed its Pride events until November due to the pandemic, some of the world's biggest Pride parades and festivals are simply moving the party online: Here are 10 events to check out this month.

[h/t NBC 6 South Florida]