Doctor Who Is About to Get Its First Female Doctor


BBC America

Nearly six months after current Doctor Who star Peter Capaldi announced that he'd be hanging up his Crombie coat at the end of this year, fans have been speculating about who would be taking over the TARDIS. On Sunday morning, BBC announced that Jodie Whittaker will become the Thirteenth Doctor—the first female lead in the show's history.

That's not the only major change the series will see when its Christmas Special premieres at the end of this year; longtime showrunner Steven Moffat is handing off creative duties to Chris Chibnall, who has written several episodes of the series over the past decade. The teaming of Chibnall and Whittaker will be a familiar one, as the two have spent the past several years working on Broadchurch, which Chibnall created and in which Whittaker stars (its stellar final season is airing on BBC America now).

“I’m beyond excited to begin this epic journey—with Chris and with every Whovian on this planet," Whittaker said in a statement. "It’s more than an honor to play the Doctor. It means remembering everyone I used to be, while stepping forward to embrace everything the Doctor stands for: hope. I can’t wait.”

“After months of lists, conversations, auditions, recalls, and a lot of secret-keeping, we’re excited to welcome Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor," Chibnall added. "I always knew I wanted the Thirteenth Doctor to be a woman and we're thrilled to have secured our number one choice. Her audition for The Doctor simply blew us all away. Jodie is an in-demand, funny, inspiring, super-smart force of nature and will bring loads of wit, strength and warmth to the role. The Thirteenth Doctor is on her way.”

Though Whittaker will make history as the first female Doctor, the idea has been floated in the past. When David Tennant parted ways with his role as the Tenth Doctor in 2008, showrunner Russell Davies said that Catherine Zeta-Jones was his first choice to replace him.

When asked what it feels like to be the first woman Doctor, Whittaker said, "It feels completely overwhelming, as a feminist, as a woman, as an actor, as a human, as someone who wants to continually push themselves and challenge themselves, and not be boxed in by what you’re told you can and can’t be. It feels incredible."

Fortunately, Whittaker already has a few friends in the Doctor Who family who she's expecting to hear from at any minute. "I’m certainly expecting a couple of calls," she admitted. "I’ve got a couple of mates in there. I’m mates with a companion [Arthur Darvill], I’m mates with a trio of Doctors. I know Matt Smith, Chris Eccleston, and obviously David Tennant. Oh! And let’s throw in David Bradley! Four Doctors! So I’m hoping I get some calls of advice."

Whittaker will make her debut in the 2017 Christmas Special, which will mark Capaldi's final episode as the Twelfth Doctor—and he couldn't be more thrilled with his choice of successor.

“Anyone who has seen Jodie Whittaker’s work will know that she is a wonderful actress of great individuality and charm," Capaldi said. "She has above all the huge heart to play this most special part. She’s going to be a fantastic Doctor.”

Swear Off Toilet Paper With This Bidet Toilet Seat That's Easy to Install and Costs Less Than $100

Tushy
Tushy

The recent coronavirus-related toilet paper shortage has put the spotlight on the TP-less alternative that Americans have yet to truly embrace: the bidet.

It's not exactly a secret that toilet paper is wasteful—it's estimated to cost 437 billion gallons of water and 15 million trees to produce our yearly supply of the stuff. But while the numbers are plain to see, bidets still aren't common in the United States.

Well, if price was ever the biggest barrier standing in the way of swearing off toilet paper for good, there's now a cost-effective way to make the switch. Right now, you can get the space-saving Tushy bidet for less than $100. And you'll be able to install it yourself in just 10 minutes.

What is a Bidet?

Before we go any further, let’s just go ahead and get the awkward technical details out of the way. Instead of using toilet paper after going to the bathroom, bidets get you clean by using a stream of concentrated water that comes out of a faucet or nozzle. Traditional bidets look like weird toilets without tanks or lids, and while they’re pretty uncommon in the United States, you’ve definitely seen one if you’ve ever been to Europe or Asia.

That said, bidets aren’t just good for your butt. When you reduce toilet paper usage, you also reduce the amount of chemicals and emissions required to produce it, which is good for the environment. At the same time, you’re also saving money. So this is a huge win-win.

Unfortunately, traditional bidets are not an option for most Americans because they take up a lot of bathroom space and require extra plumbing. That’s where Tushy comes in.

The Tushy Classic Bidet Toilet Seat.

Unlike traditional bidets, the Tushy bidet doesn’t take up any extra space in your bathroom. It’s an attachment for your existing toilet that places an adjustable self-cleaning nozzle at the back of the bowl, just underneath the seat. But it doesn’t require any additional plumbing or electricity. All you have to do is remove the seat from your toilet, connect the Tushy to the clean water supply behind the toilet, and replace the seat on top of the Tushy attachment.

The Tushy has a control panel that lets you adjust the angle and pressure of the water stream for a perfect custom clean. The nozzle lowers when the Tushy is activated and retracts into its housing when not in use, keeping it clean and sanitary.

Like all bidets, the Tushy system takes a little getting used to. But once you get the hang of it, you’ll never want to use toilet paper again. In fact, Tushy is so sure you’ll love their product, they offer customers a 60-day risk-free guarantee. If you don’t love your Tushy, you can send it back for a full refund, minus shipping and handling.

Normally, the Tushy Classic retails for $109, but right now you can get the Tushy Classic for just $89. So if you’ve been thinking about going TP-free, now is definitely the time to do it.

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

How a ‘Censored’ Version of Back to the Future Part II Made It to Netflix

Michael J. Fox in Back to the Future Part II (1989).
Michael J. Fox in Back to the Future Part II (1989).
Universal Studios

This year marks the 35th anniversary of Back to the Future, the timeless sci-fi comedy classic about a teen named Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) who goes back to 1955 to make sure his parents fall in love. The film was a huge hit, with two sequels, Back to the Future Part II and Back to the Future Part III, arriving back to back in 1989 and 1990.

All three films are currently streaming on Netflix, but fans may have noticed something amiss about Back to the Future Part II: It was briefly censored.

In the scene where Marty arrives in 2015 and finds a sports almanac, a provocative magazine titled Oh LaLa falls out from the dust jacket. In the Netflix version, the scene cuts away before the cover of the magazine is shown.

Because the film is rated PG, nothing on the cover could be construed as overly titillating. So what happened? Speaking with The Hollywood Reporter, screenwriter Bob Gale said that Universal mistakenly supplied Netflix with a censored version of the film that excised the Oh LaLa cover to be palatable for international distribution. Gale isn’t sure which country found the cover offensive, but said that the edit was made a long time ago without either his authorization or that of director Robert Zemeckis. He was alerted to the change when a fan wrote to say they had noticed and asked why it was made.

Gale said that the error has been corrected and that the version of Back to the Future Part II now streaming on Netflix is unedited.

[h/t Gizmodo]