London's Natural History Museum Has a New Star Attraction: An Amazing Blue Whale Skeleton

Natural History Museum
Natural History Museum

In January 2017, London’s Natural History Museum said goodbye to Dippy, the Diplodocus dinosaur skeleton cast that had presided over the institution’s grand entrance hall since 1979. Dippy is scheduled to tour the UK from early 2018 to late 2020—and taking his place in Hintze Hall, The Guardian reports, is a majestic 82-foot blue whale skeleton named Hope.

Hope was officially unveiled to the public on July 14. The massive skeleton hangs suspended from the hall’s ceiling, providing visitors with a 360-degree view of the largest animal ever to have lived on Earth.

Technically, Hope isn’t a new addition to the Natural History Museum, which was first established in 1881. The skeleton is from a whale that beached itself at the mouth of Ireland's Wexford Harbor in 1891 after being injured by a whaler. A town merchant sold the skeleton to the museum for just a couple of hundred pounds, and in 1934, the bones were displayed in the Mammal Hall, where they hung over a life-size blue whale model.

The whale skeleton remained in the Mammal Hall until 2015, when museum workers began preparing the skeleton for its grand debut in Hintze Hall. "Whilst working on the 221 bones we uncovered past conservation treatments, such as the use of newspaper in the 1930s to fill the gaps between the vertebrae," Lorraine Cornish, the museum's head of conservation, said in a statement. "And we were able to use new methods for the first time, including 3D printing a small number of bones missing from the right flipper."

Once restoration was complete, Hope was suspended above Hintze Hall in a diving position. There she hangs as one of the museum’s new major attractions—and as a reminder of humanity’s power to conserve endangered species.

"The Blue Whale as a centerpiece tells a hopeful story about our ability to create a sustainable future for ourselves and other species," according to a museum press release. "Humans were responsible for both pushing the Blue Whale to the brink of extinction but also responsible for its protection and recovery. We hope that this remarkable story about the Blue Whale will be told by parents and grandparents to their children for many years to come, inspiring people to think differently about the natural world."

Check out some pictures of Hope below.

 “Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

“Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

“Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

“Hope,” a blue whale skeleton suspended from the ceiling of Hintze Hall in London’s Natural History Museum.
Natural History Museum

[h/t Design Boom]

New York City Falcon Cam Reveals Nest With Four Eggs

BrianEKushner, iStock via Getty Images
BrianEKushner, iStock via Getty Images

The urban jungle of New York City supports a vibrant wildlife population. One animal that calls the city home is the peregrine falcon, once an endangered species, that has been seen around downtown Manhattan for decades. Recently, a livestream of the falcons of 55 Water Street revealed that one of them is about to be a mom.

The camera on top of the skyscraper at 55 Water Street peers into a falcon nesting site, and a female peregrine falcon there has been displaying incubating behaviors since at least late March, according to the Downtown Alliance's blog. It was assumed she had laid eggs, though this wasn't confirmed until she flew away from her nest on the afternoon of March 31. Her absence left four eggs in clear view of the building's bird camera.

It also created some concern among viewers. When female falcons leave the nest to hunt, the father usually takes over incubating duties—something that didn't happen in this case. Fortunately, the mother wasn't gone long enough to put her eggs in any real danger. She returned later that afternoon, and is currently nesting right where the internet can see her.

Peregrine falcon eggs need to be incubated for about 33 days, so expect to see them hatch sometime within the next month. In the meantime, here are some more animal livestreams to check out.

Busch Is Donating Three Months’ Worth of Beer to People Who Adopt or Foster Shelter Dogs During the Coronavirus Pandemic

This dog can turn a foster home into a forever home with one slobbery smile.
This dog can turn a foster home into a forever home with one slobbery smile.
Nataba/iStock via Getty Images

If getting to play with a happy, lovable pup isn’t already enough of an incentive to foster or adopt a shelter dog, Busch is throwing in a bonus—three months’ worth of free beer.

CNN reports that the “Foster a Dog, Get Busch” deal is available to the first 500 people who foster or adopt from Midwest Animal Rescue & Services (MARS) in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Fostering is free, and adoption costs between $200 and $600 (which covers all required vetting services, including deworming, vaccines, spaying or neutering, and more).

The offer is meant to encourage folks to help animals in need at a time when many shelters are canceling adoption events or temporarily shutting down to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus. According to People, Busch is donating an additional $25,000 to MARS to keep the animals safe and cared for.

“During these uncertain and lonelier times, people need an escape: cue the cute puppy memes and photos,” a Busch spokesperson told People. “But as much as we need those cute puppy pics to help get us through social distancing, it’s actually them who need us.”

If you’re interested in hanging out with a MARS rescue and a refreshing bottle of Busch, you can apply to foster a dog here. Once you’ve finished the process and received a confirmation email from the shelter, you should send a screenshot of that email to Busch through Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram before April 25. (Since only the first 500 people will be able to claim your prize, we recommend passing along that confirmation email as soon as you get it.) Busch will respond to winners via social media and send them each a prepaid debit card for $100.

You can take Busch’s advice and use it to buy a hefty supply of alcohol, or you can spend it on something else that’ll help pass the time during self-isolation—like a pop culture subscription box, or products for an indoor garden.

[h/t CNN]

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