Is Jon Snow About to Learn the Truth of His Lineage on Game of Thrones?

HBO
HBO

Warning: This post contains spoilers about "The Spoils of War," Game of Thrones's fourth episode in season 7, plus predictions about future episodes. If you’re not caught up, stop reading now.

Game of Thrones's Jon Snow, a man tragically incapable of knowing anything, may be on the verge of finally learning something about himself: the secret of his lineage. A brief moment in the teaser trailer for "Eastwatch," the fifth episode of season seven, hints that Jon could begin to piece together the truth about his Targaryen ancestry as soon as next week.

The season six finale confirmed the long debated R + L = J fan theory for the audience. Jon is not Ned Stark’s bastard, but the illegitimate child of Lyanna Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen. That makes him a Targaryen by blood—and Daenerys's nephew. Neither of them know this, of course, and Daenerys told Jon she was the last Targaryen as recently as last week’s episode.

But, in a snippet of the episode 5 teaser, HBO hints at a moment in next week’s show that could put the pair on the path to enlightenment. About 15 seconds into the trailer, Jon comes face to face with a dragon for the first time.

It’s possible that Drogon, the dragon Daenerys rode into battle in epic fashion in "The Spoils of War," will recognize Jon's Targaryen blood. Drogon may behave differently around him, showing the same kind of deference that is usually only reserved for Daenerys. If the queen realizes Jon and Drogon have a connection, she may offer to let him ride another dragon—perhaps Rhaegal, the one named after his father. That would move us one step closer to the completion of the Three-Headed Dragon theory, which predicts a rider for each of Daenerys’s three dragons.

Jon’s discovery of his lineage wouldn't come a moment too soon. With Jon riding into battle on a dragon’s back, the Night King’s army wouldn't seem nearly so unstoppable. It might also put the brakes on the force of attraction that appears to be pulling Jon and Daenerys together since their jaunt through the caves of Dragonstone. It’s unclear if this series has room for another incestuous main character couple, but Kit Harington has confirmed that the King in the North is definitely crushing on his aunt.

10 Rad Gifts for Hikers

Greg Rosenke/Unsplash
Greg Rosenke/Unsplash

The popularity of bird-watching, camping, and hiking has skyrocketed this year. Whether your gift recipients are weekend warriors or seasoned dirtbags, they'll appreciate these tools and gear for getting most out of their hiking experience.

1. Stanley Nesting Two-Cup Cookset; $14

Amazon

Stanley’s compact and lightweight cookset includes a 20-ounce stainless steel pot with a locking handle, a vented lid, and two insulated 10-ounce tumblers. It’s the perfect size for brewing hot coffee, rehydrating soup, or boiling water while out on the trail with a buddy. And as some hardcore backpackers note in their Amazon reviews, your favorite hiker can take the tumblers out and stuff the pot with a camp stove, matches, and other necessities to make good use of space in their pack.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Osprey Sirrus and Stratos 24-Liter Hiking Packs; $140

Amazon

Osprey’s packs are designed with trail-tested details to maximize comfort and ease of use. The Sirrus pack (pictured) is sized for women, while the Stratos fits men’s proportions. Both include an internal sleeve for a hydration reservoir, exterior mesh and hipbelt pockets, an attachment for carrying trekking poles, and a built-in rain cover.

Buy them: Amazon, Amazon

3. Yeti Rambler 18-Ounce Bottle; $48

Amazon

Nothing beats ice-cold water after a summer hike or a sip of hot tea during a winter walk. The Yeti Rambler can serve up both: Beverages can stay hot or cold for hours thanks to its insulated construction, and its steel body (in a variety of colors) is basically indestructible. It will add weight to your hiker's pack, though—for a lighter-weight, non-insulated option, the tried-and-true Camelbak Chute water bottle is incredibly sturdy and leakproof.

Buy it: Amazon

4. Mappinners Greatest 100 Hikes of the National Parks Scratch-Off Poster; $30

Amazon

The perfect gift for park baggers in your life (or yourself), this 16-inch-by-20-inch poster features epic hikes like Angel’s Landing in Zion National Park and Half Dome in Yosemite National Park. Once the hike is complete, you can scratch off the gold foil to reveal an illustration of the park.

Buy it: Amazon

5. National Geographic Adventure Edition Road Atlas; $19

Amazon

Hikers can use this brand-new, updated road atlas to plan their next adventure. In addition to comprehensive maps of all 50 states, Puerto Rico, Canada, and Mexico, they'll get National Geographic’s top 100 outdoor destinations, useful details about the most popular national parks, and points on the maps noting off-the-beaten-path places to explore.  

Buy it: Amazon

6. Adventure Medical Kits Hiker First-Aid Kit; $25

Amazon

This handy 67-piece kit is stuffed with all the things you hope your hiker will never need in the wilderness. Not only does it contain supplies for pain, cuts and scrapes, burns, and blisters (every hiker’s nemesis!), the items are organized clearly in the bag to make it easy to find tweezers or an alcohol wipe in an emergency.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Hiker Hunger Ultralight Trekking Poles; $70

Amazon

Trekking poles will help increase your hiker's balance and stability and reduce strain on their lower body by distributing it to their arms and shoulders. This pair is made of carbon fiber, a super-strong and lightweight material. From the sweat-absorbing cork handles to the selection of pole tips for different terrain, these poles answer every need on the trail. 

Buy it: Amazon

8. Leatherman Signal Camping Multitool; $120

Amazon

What can’t this multitool do? This gadget contains 19 hiking-friendly tools in a 4.5-inch package, including pliers, screwdrivers, bottle opener, saw, knife, hammer, wire cutter, and even an emergency whistle.

Buy it: Amazon

9. RAVPower Power Bank; $24

Amazon

Don’t let your hiker get caught off the grid with a dead phone. They can charge RAVPower’s compact power bank before they head out on the trail, and then use it to quickly juice up a phone or tablet when the batteries get low. Its 3-inch-by-5-inch profile won’t take up much room in a pack or purse.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Pack of Four Indestructible Field Books; $14

Amazon

Neither rain, nor snow, nor hail will be a match for these waterproof, tearproof 3.5-inch-by-5.5-inch notebooks. Your hiker can stick one in their pocket along with a regular pen or pencil to record details of their hike or brainstorm their next viral Tweet.

Buy it: Amazon

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10 Facts About Famed Paranormal Investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren  

Ed Warren and Lorraine Warren in Amityville II: The Possession (1982).
Ed Warren and Lorraine Warren in Amityville II: The Possession (1982).
Warner Bros. Home Entertainment

When it comes to investigations of the paranormal kind, no two ghost hunters loom larger than Ed and Lorraine Warren. Over the course of 50 years, Ed, a demonologist, and Lorraine, a trance medium, looked into thousands of cases around the globe, and claimed to have encountered phenomena so scary that their exploits were often turned into films, including The Amityville Horror, The Conjuring movies, and The Haunting In Connecticut. But even if you're familiar with their most famous cases, there's probably still a lot you don't know about the Warrens.

1. Ed Warren grew up in a haunted house.

Ed Warren826 Paranormal via Flickr // CC BY 2.0

When Ed was 5, he claimed he saw an apparition: a dot of light that grew until it became his family's landlady, who had died the year before. In The Demonologist: The Extraordinary Career of Ed and Lorraine Warren, Ed recalled that she was "semi-transparent, wearing what looked like some sort of shroud ... then she vanished." Soon after, Ed was having dreams of dead relatives he’d never met, including an aunt who would send him messages about his future, telling him that he would help many priests but never become a priest himself. "I'm not a priest today, but I do work closely with them," he said in The Demonologist.

2. Lorraine Warren discovered her abilities when she was a child.

Like Ed, Lorraine began having unusual experiences when she was young, too—but she just assumed everyone had those same abilities. That all changed when she was 12. As she recalled in The Demonologist, it was Arbor Day at her all-girls' private school, and her classmates had just planted a sapling. "Just as soon as they put the sapling in the ground, I saw it as a fully grown tree ... filled with leaves blowing in the wind," she said. When a nun asked her why she was staring at the sky, Lorraine responded, "I told her I was just looking up into the tree ... 'Are you seeing the future?' she asked me, just as sternly. 'Yes,' I admitted, 'I guess I am.'"

3. Ed and Lorraine Warren began dating as teenagers.

Ed and Lorraine both lived in Connecticut and met in 1944, when they were both just 16 years old—Ed worked as an usher at a movie theater that Lorraine and her mother frequented. They began dating, and soon after, Ed went off to fight World War II.

4. Ed and Lorraine Warren got married in 1945, thanks to a sunken ship.

In 1945, when Ed was 17 years old, he enlisted in the Navy. He had only been deployed for a total of four months when he was sent back home on a 30-day "Survivor's Leave" after his ship went down in the North Atlantic Sea. It was during that short break that Ed and Lorraine got married, then he returned to war. The couple later had a daughter named Judy.

5. The Warrens thought they'd make their livings as artists.

The Conjuring (2013).Warner Bros.

After the war, the Warrens had to figure out how to make a living. "Each of us had skills as landscape artists, and we each harbored a desire to paint," Lorraine said. Ed had taken art classes, so, she said, "we began our marriage under the assumption that we were going to be artists."

Rather than painting landscapes, the Warrens decided on a more unusual subject on which to focus: haunted houses, which Ed found in the newspaper. They'd go to the houses, sketch them, then knock on the door and "offer [the sketch] for information about the haunting," Lorraine said. If the story was compelling enough, they'd actually paint the house and sell that artwork later. They spent about five years going around the United States, painting and investigating haunted houses.

6. Lorraine Warren was initially a skeptic.

Despite her early experiences with clairvoyance, Lorraine didn’t believe in ghosts until later in life, after she and Ed began visiting and painting haunted houses. "In the beginning, I was more than a bit wary of the people with whom we spoke," she said in The Demonologist. "I thought they were kind of suffering from overactive imaginations or were just making things up to get attention." But when she noticed the similarities between the experiences—including from people who had never met, and who were from opposite sides of the country—she became a believer.

7. Ed and Lorraine Warren founded the New England Society for Psychic Research in 1952.

The Warrens founded the New England Society for Psychic Research to document their cases, and they also created The Occult Museum—a space in their Monroe, Connecticut, home, which adjoined Ed's office—to house haunted objects and the files and tapes from their investigations. Today, the NESPR is run by the Warrens's daughter Judy and son-in-law, Tony Spera, and its website keeps a log of some of the cases the Warrens investigated, including that of an alleged werewolf and the infamous possessed doll, Annabelle.

8. Lorraine Warren had her abilities tested.

Lorraine WarrenJason Kempin, Getty Images

As the Warrens began taking on bigger and bigger cases, skepticism about the couple grew. To quiet critics, Lorraine agreed to be tested by Dr. Thelma Moss, an actress-turned-psychologist and parapsychologist (a researcher with an interest in the occult) working in a UCLA lab studying things like Kirlian photography. She found that Lorraine's clairvoyance was “far above average,” according to The Demonologist.

9. Ed and Lorraine Warren never charged money for their investigations.

Instead, they made a living from giving lectures at colleges, and by licensing the rights to their stories for film, TV, and book projects.

10. Ed and Lorraine Warren saw their main roles as educators.

The Warrens began giving lectures because, according to The Demonologist, there was a growing interest in the occult in the late 1960s, and many of the people they saw affected by dark phenomena were college students. They hoped that, through their lectures, they might discourage people from exploring the occult in the first place.