Insomnia can take a huge toll on the body. It's the most commonly reported sleep disorder—an estimated 10 percent of the U.S. population has it—and causes lack of energy, difficulty concentrating, and irritability, among other effects. And severe insomnia is usually chronic.

So it's understandable that people who have trouble sleeping are always on the lookout for a new treatment. Some people say they've found it in a lotion made by Lush. According to the Independent, insomniacs are calling Lush's Sleepy body lotion "magic."

Is it really a magic potion? No. Will it help you sleep? It's hard to say, but there's some research to suggest it could. It certainly isn't a panacea for insomnia, and people with severe insomnia probably won't see much effect from a lotion.

Lavender has long served as an herbal remedy to relax and soothe. A 2012 review of studies on lavender and sleep advised, "Early results appear promising, but they should be viewed with caution," since most of these studies are very small, and noted the results "suggested lavender oil may be of small to moderate benefit." For instance, a 2017 study on ICU patients found that inhaling lavender essential oil for 15 days increased sleep quality and reduced anxiety levels. A 2015 study on college students found lavender to be an effective sleep aid, particularly in conjunction with good sleep hygiene.

Making lotioning up a part of your nighttime routine could mean that you're placing more focus on sleep hygiene, which is a proven way to enhance your sleep quality. According to a report from India's National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, poor sleep hygiene can perpetuate insomnia. To get better sleep, the National Sleep Foundation recommends establishing a regular, relaxing bedtime routine, like taking a bath or reading a book. Applying lotion would count, too.

Plus, recent studies have found that even placebos can help insomniacs sleep a bit better. In a review of 13 published studies, participants who received placebos in sleep studies reported sleep improvements compared to people who took part in the studies but didn't receive any kind of treatment. So even if the lavender doesn't help—most studies on lavender have analyzed inhaling the essential oil, not rubbing a lotion on your skin—having a ton of faith in Lush's ability to cure an affliction that plagues millions of people might. At least a little.

[h/t Independent]