Wild Lizards Care What You're Wearing

Bad news, pals: Your mom isn't the only one judging your outfit. A recent study published in the journal PLOS One finds that wild animals—in this case, lizards—respond differently to humans depending on the color of their clothes.

It makes perfect sense, if you think about it. Animals rely on their color vision to find food, evade predators, and seduce their mates. From a survival standpoint, color is information, no matter who's wearing it.

Previous studies have found that some bird species with orange or red feathers are less afraid of people wearing orange and red. Would other brightly colored animals have a similar response?

To find out, evolutionary biologist Breanna Putman considered a lizard. The western fence lizard makes its home in the desert climes of the western United States. Both sexes are brown or black, but the males have vibrant blue patches on their bellies and throats, and some have shiny blue spots on their backs. When challenged, males do little push-ups to flex their blue scales and make them look even more impressive. Blue, then, was the color to beat.

Putnam headed out to two lizard hotspots, one at a public park in Los Angeles and another at a nearby nature reserve. The bird studies had only compared people wearing orange and red with people wearing dark gray, which means it's possible that the birds would have responded well to any bright color. So Putnam brought along four t-shirts: one each in dark blue, light blue, bright red, and gray. The dark blue shirt was a pretty close match to the color of the male lizards' macho patches.

For each trial, Putnam put on a shirt, then tried to approach a lizard. At first, she merely walked casually toward them. After a few weeks of this, she switched and began trying to catch them. For every approach, she measured how close the lizard let her get, and how quickly and how far it ran away.

Sure enough, the dark-blue shirt seemed to put the lizards at ease, or at least more at ease than the rest of her wardrobe. While Putnam wore their favorite color, the lizards let her get twice as close (39 inches vs. 78 inches) than they did with other colors. They also didn't try very hard to escape. In red, light blue, or gray, Putnam caught her quarry 40 percent of the time. In dark blue, that number went up to 84 percent.

The findings are a good reminder to all animal researchers, Putnam said in a statement. "What we wear can have indirect effects on animals through changes in their behavior."

Amazon's Under-the-Radar Coupon Page Features Deals on Home Goods, Electronics, and Groceries

Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Stock Catalog, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

Now that Prime Day is over, and with Black Friday and Cyber Monday still a few weeks away, online deals may seem harder to come by. And while it can be a hassle to scour the internet for promo codes, buy-one-get-one deals, and flash sales, Amazon actually has an extensive coupon page you might not know about that features deals to look through every day.

As pointed out by People, the coupon page breaks deals down by categories, like electronics, home & kitchen, and groceries (the coupons even work with SNAP benefits). Since most of the deals revolve around the essentials, it's easy to stock up on items like Cottonelle toilet paper, Tide Pods, Cascade dishwasher detergent, and a 50 pack of surgical masks whenever you're running low.

But the low prices don't just stop at necessities. If you’re looking for the best deal on headphones, all you have to do is go to the electronics coupon page and it will bring up a deal on these COWIN E7 PRO noise-canceling headphones, which are now $80, thanks to a $10 coupon you could have missed.

Alternatively, if you are looking for deals on specific brands, you can search for their coupons from the page. So if you've had your eye on the Homall S-Racer gaming chair, you’ll find there's currently a coupon that saves you 5 percent, thanks to a simple search.

To discover all the deals you have been missing out on, head over to the Amazon Coupons page.

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Treat Your Feline This Holiday Season With Fancy Feast’s Cat Food Advent Calendar

Fancy Feast/Chewy
Fancy Feast/Chewy

In anticipation of the holiday season, many children and adults get to unwrap mini presents each of the 24 days leading up to Christmas day, during what's known as Advent. Though Advent itself dates back to the 4th century, the version we know today, complete with the chocolate-filled calendars, was popularized in the early 1900s. And apparently it's no longer just for humans, because Fancy Feast is letting your feline roommate in on the fun with this unique cat food Advent calendar, now available at Chewy for $23.

For the 24 days leading up to Christmas, your cat will get to enjoy a variety of different wet foods, including favorites like grilled salmon, chicken, and more. There is even a unique ornament included with each calendar featuring a cat in the shape of a heart that can go right onto your tree. (Also, don't be surprised to find your actual cat making its way into the middle of your tree; they're known climbers.)

Now while you enjoy your Advent calendars from brands like LEGO, Funko, and more, your cat will be able to join in on the fun as well. To learn more about Fancy Feast's Feastivites Advent Calendar, head on over to Chewy.

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